Stories about: cord blood

From fish to people – first drug ID’d in zebrafish crosses a milestone

A recent clinical trial brings the drug FT1050 one step closer to becoming the first drug identified with the help of zebrafish (above) to make it to patients. (Soulkeeper/Wikimedia Commons)

In 2007, working with zebrafish, Leonard Zon and his team in Children’s Stem Cell Program made an unexpected discovery: That a drug originally developed to treat stomach ulcers could boost the production of blood stem cells, by about four-fold.

That drug – FT1050, a chemical variant of a fatty, hormone-like molecule called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) – recently crossed a major milestone: the successful conclusion of a Phase I clinical trial. Led by Zon’s colleague Corey Cutler, a clinical researcher at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the trial aimed to determine the drug’s safety as a way of helping patients who receive umbilical cord blood stem cell transplants recover their immune function more quickly.

The trial brings the FT1050 one step closer to becoming the first drug identified with the help of zebrafish to make it to patients.

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