Stories about: crowdsourcing

Fever, revisited: ResearchKit app will tap crowd-sourced temperature data

Feverprints temperature

What, exactly, is a fever?

It’s a surprisingly simple but important question in medicine. While a body temperature of 98.6°F (37°C) is generally considered “normal,” this number doesn’t account for temperature differences between individuals — and even within individuals at various times of the day. While a common sign of infection, fever can also occur with other medical conditions, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases.

“Many factors come together to set an individual’s ‘normal’ temperature, such as age, size, time of day and maybe even ancestry,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, the director of informatics for Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) and a member of the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program. “We want to help create a better understanding of the normal temperature variations throughout the day, to learn to use fever as a tool to improve medical diagnosis, and to evaluate the effect of fever medications on symptoms and disease course.”

That’s where Feverprints comes in

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Tapping crowds for science: From galaxies to diabetes

Photo: ausnahmezustand/Flickr

What do a project cataloging pictures of galaxies, an RNA folding game, and a call for people with diabetes to contribute data all have in common?

Each is part of a new revolution in science. Called “citizen science,” this revolution takes science out of traditional academic or industrial environments and into the population at large, asking the general public to take part in activities that further particular areas of research.

Citizen science projects tap the aggregate computing power of crowds to help collect or analyze huge data sets, running the gamut from online games (e.g., FoldIt, EteRNA) to screen savers that make use of your computer while it’s asleep (e.g., SETI@home) to projects asking people to count or categorize images from large-scale astronomy projects (e.g., GalaxyZoo, Stardust@home). Some even try to reduce animal-vehicle collisions on the nation’s roadways by cataloging and mapping roadkill.

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