Stories about: CT

Has lung MRI for children come of age?

Chest MRI and CT scans from a child
With the latest technologies and techniques, MRI (bottom) is in many cases just as good as, if not better than, CT (top) when taking images of a child's chest. (Courtesy Edward Y. Lee, MD, MPH)

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, can produce stunningly detailed images of the body’s tissues and structures. Historically, however, the chest—and in particular, the lungs and airway—has proven challenging for radiologists to clearly visualize through MR images.

Why is that? Unlike most other solid organs, the lung and trachea aren’t really solid. The air spaces within them do not absorb the magnetic fields or produce the radio signals needed to generate high-quality diagnostic images. Also, they are in constant motion—we have to breathe, after all.

For these reasons, radiologists have long relied on x-rays and computed tomography (CT) scans to take pictures of the lungs. Both can produce very good, highly detailed diagnostic images, but both also come with risks related to their reliance on ionizing radiation.

The lung MRI’s time may now have come. In a review paper in Radiologic Clinics of North America (RCNA), an international team of radiologists led by Simon Warfield, PhD, and Edward Y. Lee, MD, MPH, of Boston Children’s Department of Radiology outlines several recent advances that have made MRI a more viable—radiation-free—alternative for diagnostic imaging of children’s lungs and airway.

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The power of numbers: Rules for reining in the use of CT scans

When does a trauma patient need a CT scan? Clinical rules could help doctors decide, and in the process help reduce a child's lifetime radiation exposure. (Image: Andrew Ciscel/Flickr)

The use of computed tomography (CT) scans has dramatically changed the practice of medicine in the past two decades. Patients with abdominal pain are no longer routinely admitted for serial abdominal exams to evaluate for appendicitis, because now we can just get the CT. Children with head trauma may need less hospital observation time in the emergency department (ED), because we can just get the CT.

But “just getting the CT” comes with costs, not just medical healthcare dollars spent but the costs associated with lethal malignancies in the future caused by the radiation used in the course of CTs.

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