Stories about: Da-Zhi Wang

Protecting damaged hearts with microRNAs

microRNAs facilitate cardiac regeneration after a heart attack
New work advances the possibility of regenerating cardiac tissue after a heart attack. (PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK)

Once the heart is fully formed, the cells that make up heart muscle, known as cardiomyocytes, have very limited ability to reproduce themselves. After a heart attack, cardiomyocytes die off; unable to make new ones, the heart instead forms scar tissue. Over time, this can set people up for heart failure.

New work published last week in Nature Communications advances the possibility of reviving the heart’s regenerative capacities using microRNAs — small molecules that regulate gene function and are abundant in developing hearts.

In 2013, Da-Zhi Wang, PhD, a cardiology researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor of pediatrics of Harvard Medical School, identified a family of microRNAs called miR-17-92 that regulates proliferation of cardiomyocytes. In new work, his team shows two family members, miR-19a and miR-19b, to be particularly potent and potentially good candidates for treating heart attack.

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