Stories about: data mining

Forecasting the convergence of artificial intelligence and precision medicine

Image of artificial DNA, which in combination with other artificial intelligence could contribute to an artificial model of the immune system
Will an artificial model of the immune system be the key to discovering new, precision vaccines?

This is part I of a two-part blog series recapping the 2018 BIO International Convention.

At the 2018 BIO International Convention last week, it was clear what’s provoking scientific minds in industry and academia — or at least those of the Guinness-world-record-making 16,000 people in attendance. Artificial intelligence, machine learning and their implications for tailor-made medicine bubbled up across all BIO’s educational tracks and a majority of discussions about the future state of biotechnology. Panelists from Boston Children’s Hospital also contributed their insights to what’s brewing at the intersection of these burgeoning fields.

Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, former chair of Boston Children’s Computational Health and Informatics Program, spoke on a panel about how large-scale patient data — if properly harnessed and analyzed for health and disease trends — is a virtual goldmine for precision medicine insights. Patterns gleaned from population health data or electronic health records, for example, could help identify which subgroups of patients who might respond better to specific therapies.

According to Kohane, who is currently the Marion J. Nelson Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS), we will soon be leveraging artificial intelligence to go through patient records and determine exactly what doctors were thinking when they saw patients.

“We’ve seen again and again that data abstraction by artificial intelligence is better than abstraction by human analysts when performed at the scale of millions of clinical notes across thousands of patients,” said Kohane.

And based on what we heard at BIO, artificial intelligence will revolutionize more than patient data mining. It will also transform the way we design precision therapeutics — and even vaccines — from the ground up.

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Tracking vaccine misconceptions–by mining online data

This 1802 British cartoon skewers the cowpox vacccine, newly introduced against smallpox. Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_cow_pock.jpg#file
This 1802 British cartoon skewers the cowpox vaccine, newly introduced against smallpox. Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_cow_pock.jpg#file

Fifty years after Boston Children’s Hospital faculty developed a vaccine against measles, the United Kingdom is seeing a surge of cases. Last year, it tracked a record 2,000 measles diagnoses—unusual for a country that used to average only a dozen cases every year. With 1,200 cases reported this year so far, that record could be broken.

The cases are the legacy of parents who decided to forgo vaccinating at least 1 million children against measles, based on a 1998 study in The Lancet linking the measles vaccine to autism. That now-retracted study became the origin of its own epidemic, carrying misinformation through a network of parents and media outlets that believed the author had discovered the cause of autism.

Until recently, tracking the spread of vaccine-related rumors was even more difficult than tracking the outbreaks such misinformation engenders. A study in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, involving Boston Children’s Hospital’s HealthMap data collection system and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, has taken a huge step toward turning that around.

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