Stories about: David Hunter

Amblyopia detection: A long climb to market for the Pediatric Vision Scanner

David Hunter Pediatric Vision Scanner
(Photo: Bruce Hunter)

David Hunter, MD, PhD, ophthalmologist-in-chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, is also developer of StrabisPix and BabySee. The Pediatric Vision Scanner received FDA marketing clearance last month.

As a pediatric ophthalmologist, I do my best to assure that every young patient I examine will have a lifetime of perfect sight. The condition that I battle most commonly is amblyopia, or “lazy eye,” in which the eye is healthy but does not develop vision — simply because the brain doesn’t receive proper input when a child’s visual system is “learning” how to see.

When I can diagnose amblyopia early enough, I can treat it with an eye patch or eye drops to block the “good” eye, giving the eye with amblyopia time to catch up. But amblyopia does not fight fairly: about half of affected kids have no visible signs of the condition. As a result, amblyopia silently steals the sight of hundreds of thousands of children — many of whom will never get their vision back because treatment started too late.

It is this problem that inspired me to develop the Pediatric Vision Scanner (PVS).

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StrabisPIX: Assessing strabismus from patients’ smartphone photos

strabismus smartphone
(Lapina/Shutterstock)

New smartphone-based diagnostic tools are enabling consumers to take their temperatures, diagnose simple skin conditions and much more. As advanced smartphone imaging puts more and more capabilities in patients’ hands, it’s no surprise that clinicians and numerous digital health startups are leveraging them.

As a case in point, the Department of Ophthalmology and the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital have co-developed a smartphone application for patients with strabismus, or misalignment of the eyes, to securely capture and transmit photos of their eyes to their providers.

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BabySee: Mobile app lets you see through an infant’s eyes

David Hunter, MD, PhD, chief of Ophthalmology at Boston Children’s Hospital, gets a lot of questions from parents, but the number one question is: “What can my baby see?”

That depends. How old is the baby?

Five days after birth, she might see something like the image at left; at 3 months, the image at right:

BabySee 5 days and 3 mos

At 6 months and 9 months, there’s increasing color and resolution:

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Ophthalmologist finds another way to be a rock star

From a series on researchers and innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital.David Hunter, MD, PhD

David G. Hunter, MD, PhD, dreamed of a career as a rock star. Instead, he became Boston Children’s Hospital’s ophthalmologist-in-chief and invented the Pediatric Vision Scanner. The device, designed for use by pediatricians, detects amblyopia or “lazy eye,” the leading cause of vision loss in children, as early as preschool age when the condition is highly correctable.

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