Stories about: decision support systems

2017 Innovators’ Showcase spotlights healthcare decision support

2017 Innovator's Showcase Boston Children's Hospital

Healthcare innovations will be on display next week — April 12 — at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator’s annual showcase. The event, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., will be kicked off by a discussion on clinical decision support with Doug Perrin, a bioengineer/computer scientist in Cardiac Surgery at Boston Children’s and Garry Steil, who is developing a glucose control technology for diabetes patients at the hospital.

Exhibits, demos and mingling will take place in the Patient Entertainment Center off the main hospital lobby (300 Longwood Avenue, Boston).

Among the roughly 20 apps, ventures and technologies on display:

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IBM’s Watson at work: Transforming health care

Part of a continuing series of videotaped sessions at Boston Children’s Hospital’s recent Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014.

What’s IBM’s Watson been up to since winning Jeopardy? Among other things, it’s been trying to help doctors make decisions. “We live in an age of information overload,” says Mike Rhodin, Senior Vice President of the IBM Watson Group. “The challenge is to now turn that information into knowledge.”

Interestingly, most of the inquiries Rhodin received post-Jeopardy were from doctors, who were interested in the way Watson sorted and ranked possible answers. Here, Rhodin and Dan Cerutti, VP of Watson Commercialization, outline IBM’s vision to improve global health care through a technology platform called CarePlex:

Stay tuned as we post more sessions from the Pediatric Innovation Summit (also available on YouTube) and read our blog coverage.

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Predictive analytics could yield next-generation decision support, says Philips Healthcare CMIO/CTO

frassica

First-generation clinical decision support has been plagued by poor uptake among physicians, largely due to its overwhelming nature and perceived lack of applicability to clinical practice. But predictive analytics, built into these platforms, could produce the next significant wave in innovation in pediatric care, according to Joseph Frassica, MD, chief medical informatics officer and chief technology officer of Philips Healthcare.

Frassica spoke about predictive analytics last week at a panel on innovation acceleration at the Boston Children’s Hospital National Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2013. Vector caught up with him afterward.

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Advanced computing meets healthcare: Disruptive changes to come

(alikins/Flickr)

The recent Bio-IT World meeting featured some exciting forecasts about disruptive healthcare advances from advanced computing technology. We’re closer than ever to process streamlining, artificial intelligence and combining the best ideas from other industries. Many themes I like to blog about — clinical decision support, data visualization, patient-entered health data — were addressed provocatively in the talks. Here are some trends I’m watching.

•    New data visualization systems will increase scientific productivity. Keynote speaker Bryn Roberts of Hoffmann-La Roche demoed a futuristic, multi-touch tool for reviewing and designing compound molecules,

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Disruptive innovation in healthcare IT: Spreading it to the masses

Photo: Paul Anderson/Creative Commons

The term disruptive innovation – introduced by Harvard Business School’s Clayton Christensen in a 1995 article  — has been used by technology-development stakeholders to describe radical innovations and their implications for market entry strategies. Christensen describes the term on his website:

“An innovation that is disruptive allows a whole new population of consumers access to a product or service that was historically only accessible to consumers with a lot of money or a lot of skill.”

Last week I heard Christensen speak at an event hosted by Vodafone,

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