Stories about: Department of Neurology

Typing medulloblastoma: From RNA to proteomics and phospho-proteomics

medulloblastoma proteomics study
Medulloblastoma (CREDIT: ARMED FORCES INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY/WIKIMEDIA)

Medulloblastoma is one of the most common pediatric brain tumors, accounting for nearly 10 percent of cases. It occurs in the cerebellum, a complex part of the brain that controls balance, coordination and motor function and regulates verbal expression and emotional modulation. While overall survival rates are high, current therapies can be toxic and cause secondary cancers. Developing alternative therapeutics is a priority for the field.

As early as the 1990s, the lab of Scott Pomeroy, MD, PhD, neurologist-in-chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, discovered molecules in medulloblastoma tumors that could predict response to therapies. In 2010, Pomeroy and colleagues uncovered four distinct molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma.

The World Health Organization updated the brain tumor classification scheme in 2016 to include these molecular and genetic features. In the new scheme, tumor subtypes with a good molecular prognosis receive less radiation and chemotherapy. But the creation of targeted therapeutics has remained a challenge, since some of the genetic pathways implicated in these subtypes are found in non-cancerous cells.

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Patients with epilepsy and inflammatory bowel disease to get DNA sequenced in study

3000 exomes study to sequence patients with epilepsy, IBD
ILLUSTRATION: ADOBE STOCK

Boston Children’s Hospital has embarked on a strategic initiative to accelerate and expand its research genomics gateway, with plans to sequence the DNA of 3,000 patients with epilepsy or inflammatory bowel disease and their family members. Patients will have access to enroll in this pilot study if their condition is of likely genetic origin but lack a diagnosis after initial clinical genetic testing.

Sequencing will cover the entire exome, containing all of a person’s protein-coding genes. The Epilepsy and IBD were chosen for the pilot because Ann Poduri, MD, MPH and Scott Snapper, MD, PhD, have already made huge inroads into the genetics of these respective disorders. Both have built large, well characterized patient databases for research purposes, have disease-specific genetic expertise and have begun using their findings to inform their patients’ care.

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From mice to humans: Genetic syndromes may be key to finding autism treatment

Boy and a mouse eye-to-eye
(Aliaksei Lasevich/stock.adobe.com)

A beautiful, happy little girl, Emma is the apple of her parents’ eyes and adored by her older sister. The only aspect of her day that is different from any other 6-month-old’s is the medicine she receives twice a day as part of a clinical trial for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

Emma’s mother was just 20 weeks pregnant when she first heard the words “tuberous sclerosis,” a rare genetic condition that causes tumors to grow in various organs of the body. Prenatal imaging showed multiple benign tumors in Emma’s heart.

Emma displays no symptoms of her disease, except for random “spikes” on her electroencephalogram (EEG) picked up by her doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital. The medication she is receiving is part of the Preventing Epilepsy Using Vigabatrin in Infants with TSC (PREVeNT) trial. Her mother desperately hopes it is the active antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin, rather than placebo.

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Arsenic and neural tube defects: Lessons from Bangladesh?

arsenic neural tube defects

Spina bifida and other neural tube defects have become fairly rare in the United States, thanks in part to folic acid added to foods and campaigns to get childbearing women to take folic acid. But in Bangladesh, spina bifida is a common occurrence on maternity wards; in fact, it is considered to be epidemic.

“No surveillance is done, so it’s not clear how many cases there are,” says Maitreyi Mazumdar, MD, MPH, a neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital who conducts environmental health research. “Children may die in delivery, or they may die before seeing a surgeon.”

Although folic acid supplementation isn’t widespread in Bangladesh, Mazumdar thinks there is another factor in play: the country’s ongoing epidemic of arsenic poisoning.

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