Stories about: design

Designing from the bottom up: Guiding healthcare stakeholders through ideation

healthcare co-design

At a recent event, Michelle Domey, mother of a child with special health care needs, found herself sharing her experience with a design expert, describing recent telehealth appointments at Boston Children’s Hospital. “My son feels like he’s having a private appointment, even though I’m sitting next to him, and his doctor is miles away,” she reflected. “Who thought that was possible through a tablet or a computer?”

As adult patients nodded in agreement, the group began to think about how to leverage Michelle’s experience to design support systems for kids with special health care needs. A software engineer expanded Michelle’s comment into a vision of the classroom of the future — a learning environment fully equipped with remote learning solutions for children with special health care needs, and environmental sensors for children with severe food allergies and health risks. The Olin College Co-Design for Better Health Innovation Lab was well underway.

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Building a better hospital…with cardboard

20150713_CardboardCity-17

It’s 1 a.m. on a Wednesday. A two-year-old boy involved in a rollover automobile accident is brought into the emergency department at Boston Children’s Hospital. A scan shows fluid in his abdomen. He is becoming progressively unstable, his blood pressure plummeting despite blood transfusions. A decision is made to bring him to the operating room (OR), where a surgical team performs an exploratory laparotomy for a liver laceration and massive bleeding.

This is a test. It is one of the many tests of Boston Children’s Simulator Program (SIMPeds).

On July 13, 14 and 15, the entire seventh floor of the nearby Longwood Center became a theater, rooms with walls of cardboard became the stage, and hospital staff members became the actors. It was just one of many simulations—complete with cardboard transfusion machines, heart-lung machines and more—intended to help architects design ORs, procedure rooms, recovery rooms and other clinical spaces. These spaces will eventually make up a new 11-story, 445,000-square-foot hospital building. During the week, similar exercises also took place for a planned facility in Waltham.

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