Stories about: devices

Boston Children’s to host second annual Innovators’ Showcase

Ten or more monitors keep track of every child in the ICU. How can clinicians manage all the data they provide?  Surgical Sam beating heart pediatric trainer mannequin simulation Simulator Program The Chamberlain GroupA prototype of the warming pad. The white color indicates that the pad's "phase-change" material is in its solid state. (Courtesy of Anne Hansen)Silk worms could create tissues needed for urinary tract reconstruction.

 

(Clockwise from top: T3, Surgical Sam, non-electric baby warmer, silk-based organ reconstruction)

Next week—on April 15—Boston-area visitors can sample inventions and technologies from around Boston Children’s Hospital, some in development and some already in use. More than 20 medical innovations will be on display in an interactive “science fair” format. We’ll be demonstrating a variety of medical devices, mobile applications, software IT innovations, wearables and bioengineering innovations. It’s free and open to the public.

The event is hosted by Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by networking time (4 to 5 p.m.).

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Show me the money: Reimbursement for medical innovations

medical device reimbursementDevice developers tend to focus on the FDA approval process—PMAs and 510(k) clearances—while overlooking another major challenge: getting insurers to cover the device. Before approaching investors, and certainly before doing any studies, keep payers in mind, advises Maren Anderson, president of MDA Consulting, Inc., which specializes in reimbursement planning.

In the old days, doctors prescribed, and insurers paid. Under health care reform, that’s changed, says Anderson.

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Magnetic needle tackles suturing in challenging surgical fields

magnetic suturing needle
A magnetic needle and thread lets surgeons maneuver in tight spots.
The current method of suturing used in surgery—stitching with a needle and thread—has been around for thousands of years. Kaifeng Liu, MD, a research fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital, hopes to reimagine this fundamental operating room practice. His workbench is filled with various prototypes of a magnetic needle, a device he hopes will make suturing simpler, faster and more efficient for researchers and clinicians alike.

“Sometimes it is the simplest things in medicine that stay the same over time,” says Liu, whose invention will be featured later this week at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014 (October 30-31).

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Three questions about Apple, Google and wearable health tech

Wearable health gadgets fitness trackers Apple HealthKit Google fit

Fitbit, Jawbone, Nike, Withings…a lot of companies are already in the wearable/mobile health technology and data tracking game. But a couple of really big players are stepping on to the court.

At their most recent Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple announced both an app and a framework—Health and HealthKit—that will tie in with various wearable technologies and health apps. HealthKit will also feed data into electronic medical record (EMR) systems like Epic, which runs at some of the largest hospitals in the country. And rumors abound that an upcoming Apple smartwatch (iWatch? iTime? Only Tim Cook knows right now) will carry a host of sensors for tracking activity and health data.

Google also wants to get into the game with a health data framework called Fit that they announced at their I/O conference in June. Unlike Apple, its strategy seems more focused on providing a standard way for trackers, devices and apps from different manufacturers to talk to Android Wear devices.

What will entry of these big players mean? We asked Michael Docktor, MD, clinical director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program.

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What’s driving millennials to health tech?

Judy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is currently serving on the Mayor’s ONEin3 Council, which works on projects dedicated to maximizing the positive impact that young people have on the City of Boston.

young health tech entrepreneurs
(ITU/Rowan Farrell creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode)

If you Google the term “millennials,” you’ll see that Google automatically fills in such search terms as “millennials lazy,” “millennials spoiled,” “millennials trophy kids” and “millennials entitled.” Ouch.

As part of the Mayor’s ONEin3 Council and a Founding Hacker for MIT’s H@cking Medicine, I could not disagree more with this assessment of my generation. I’ve observed young people increasingly drawn to civically minded work with public impact—including work in health tech.

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It’s just a hat: Simplicity in innovation

Clinical innovations don't have to be complex. Sometimes, as nurse Karen Sakakeeny has found, an innovation can be as simple as a hat (shown here on a doll). (Courtesy Karen Sakakeeny)

When we think about innovation, especially in health care, our thoughts often turn to the highly complex: new surgical procedures, new drugs, new devices or machines, etc.

But innovation in medicine and patient care doesn’t have to be complex. Sometimes it can be very simple. Like a hat.

Karen Sakakeeny has been a clinical nurse for more than 30 years, spending much of that time in the operating room. While doing a stint in cardiac surgery, she found herself thinking about ways to improve the rewarming process for infants undergoing open heart surgery.

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Guiding devices to market, and mending broken hearts

A biodegradable patch for repairing ventral septal defects (VSDs).

Imagine: You’re a pediatric cardiologist who for years has worked on the design of a device that could revolutionize the treatment of a severe atrial arrhythmia. But while you can find a lot of assistance and advice for bringing devices for adults to market, you find little help for devices intended for infants and children. What can you do?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration could be your best friend. Better known for its role in establishing and enforcing regulations for drug and device safety and information, the FDA is also an advocate, helping bring innovative devices for pediatric treatment into clinical practice. Pedro del Nido, chief of cardiac surgery at Children’s Hospital Boston, outlined the FDA’s advocacy role last week at the monthly Innovators’ Forum hosted by the Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program.

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