Stories about: drug repurposing

Teaching an old drug a new trick to treat an ultra-rare red-blood-cell disease

Failed sickle-cell drug learns a new trick: hereditary xerocytosis

The National Institutes of Health maintains a library of drugs, the Clinical Collection, that are safe for humans but failed in clinical trials or didn’t make it to the market for other reasons. These compounds, numbering 450 to date, are just sitting on the shelf, waiting for a researcher to identify a disease process they might treat.

Repurposing such drugs could potentially save the pharmaceutical industry time and money. Getting a new drug from R&D to market currently takes $2 to 3 billion and 13 to 15 years. In contrast, some estimate that repurposing a safe drug could cost just $300 million and take just 6.5 years.

Pfizer, one of the biggest pharma companies in the world, saw the appeal. It just launched SpringWorks Therapeutics, a mission-driven company dedicated to reviving shelved drugs to treat underserved diseases. In its pipeline are experimental therapies to treat four diseases that currently have no cure.

One of the earliest-stage candidates is senicapoc.

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When is an antipsychotic not an antipsychotic? When it’s an antileukemic

A zebrafish model of leukemia has helped find that an antipsychotic drug has anticancer properties.One of the hot trends in drug discovery could be called drug re-discovery: finding new uses for drugs that have already received FDA approval for a different indication.

It’s an approach that allows researchers and clinicians to rapidly test potential treatments for rare or difficult-to-treat conditions. Because the drug’s safety profile is already known, much of the preclinical and early clinical work that goes into developing a drug can be bypassed.

It was this kind of strategy that Alejandro Gutierrez, MD, and A. Thomas Look, MD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, and Jon Aster, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, had in mind when they started screening a library of nearly 5,000 FDA-approved compounds, off-patent drugs and natural products using a zebrafish model of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).

And with that strategy, they may have struck gold. Just not in the way they had expected.

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