Stories about: DVTs

Catching platelets with NETs: Neutrophils and deep vein thrombosis

Sea cucumbers drive off attackers by expelling their innards. Neutrophils do the same, forming NETs to fight bacteria. But that same capability might also help fuel dangerous blood clots. (Anders Poulsen/Wikimedia Commons)

Sea cucumbers have an unusual way of defending themselves. When threatened, they ensnare their foes with sticky threads. Some even expel their own internal organs to repel attackers.

Immune system cells called neutrophils sometimes do much the same: When confronted with bacteria, they unravel and shoot out their chromatin—the tightly wound mix of DNA and proteins that keeps genes packaged in cells. The resulting molecular mesh, known as a neutrophil extracellular trap, or NET, traps and kills bacteria, providing an additional line of defense against bloodstream infections.

But neutrophils and NETs can go awry. Since 2010, Denisa Wagner, PhD, of the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, has been studying NETs’ role in deep vein thromboses (DVTs)—blood clots that form in veins deep in the body where blood clots shouldn’t, usually in the legs.

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