Stories about: EBV

Immune system to Epstein-Barr virus-fueled cancers: “I’ve got an eye on you”

In the vast majority of us, the Epstein-Barr virus (above) causes mild illness and never bothers us again. However, it can lay dormant in small numbers of B cells for years, waking up if the immune surveillance keeping it in check is broken and fueling lymphomas. (NCI)

Some 90 percent of us are exposed to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at some point in our lives. While the immune system’s T cells rapidly clear most EBV-infected B cells, about one in a million infected cells escapes destruction. Within these cells, the virus enters a latent phase, kept in check by the watchful eye of so-called memory T cells.

This uneasy relationship usually holds steady for the rest of our lives, unless something suppresses the immune system – such as infection with HIV or use of anti-rejection drugs after a transplant – and breaks the surveillance. The virus can then reawaken and drive the development of certain B cell cancers.

How do our T cells keep their watch?

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