Stories about: entrepreneurship

Bridging academia and industry: Q & A with scientist and entrepreneur Timothy Springer

Timothy Springer on entrepreneurship

Biological chemist and molecular pharmacologist Timothy A. Springer, PhD, is poised at the nexus of academia and industry. As an academic — currently at Harvard Medical School, the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center — he has used monoclonal antibodies as research tools to unravel key mysteries of the immune system. As an entrepreneur, his discoveries — and those of others he has backed — have successfully launched seven companies. Drawing from his own entrepreneurship experience, he now aims to create his own innovation center, focused on accelerating antibody science toward drug discovery while helping nurture and mentor young scientist entrepreneurs. Vector sat down with Springer for his insights.

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Timothy Springer: scientist, serial entrepreneur and social advocate

Tim Springer resized

At the dawn of his career, immunologist, biological chemist, molecular pharmacologist and seven-time biomedical entrepreneur Timothy Springer thought science was a bad idea. “I was suspect of the purposes that science had been put to,” he says, “making Agent Orange and napalm.”

It was 1966, and Springer was a Yale undergrad thinking, “What the hell good is this Ivy League education? The best and brightest, the Ivy League-educated people, totally screwed up in getting us into the Vietnam War.”

So he dropped out. For a year, he lived on a Native American reservation in Nevada for Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA). He helped the Tribal Council draft resolutions, launched a 4-H club and lobbied for paved roads so kids could go to school.

Finally, he returned to school at the University of California, Berkeley — trying anthropology, sociology and psychology. Switching to biochemistry his junior year, Springer asked his advisor, scientific visionary Daniel Koshland, Jr., former editor of Science, “Do you think I can do this — graduate with a degree in biochemistry?”

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What’s driving millennials to health tech?

Judy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is currently serving on the Mayor’s ONEin3 Council, which works on projects dedicated to maximizing the positive impact that young people have on the City of Boston.

young health tech entrepreneurs
(ITU/Rowan Farrell creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode)

If you Google the term “millennials,” you’ll see that Google automatically fills in such search terms as “millennials lazy,” “millennials spoiled,” “millennials trophy kids” and “millennials entitled.” Ouch.

As part of the Mayor’s ONEin3 Council and a Founding Hacker for MIT’s H@cking Medicine, I could not disagree more with this assessment of my generation. I’ve observed young people increasingly drawn to civically minded work with public impact—including work in health tech.

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Attracting venture capitalists: 6 tips to get ready for the shark tank

metaphor for investors "shark tank"If you’ve ever watched Shark Tank, you’ve gotten a taste of venture capitalists’ (VC) innate skepticism and hard-nosed ability to triage ideas. A recent webinar hosted by Cambridge Healthtech Associates offered a good practical “101” for scientists, inventors and clinical innovators—which we’ve distilled into the six tips below.

1.  Find the pain.

VCs will want to know what “pain points” you are solving—the burning need or unpleasant thing a customer wants to avoid or fix right now. In health care, this could be the need for a more definitive diagnostic test or a cost-saving option, or, for the pharmaceutical industry, the need to reduce R&D costs by finding a better way to pick compounds to take to clinical trial.

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Can we hack our way to better health care?

lightbulbs_together_shutterstock_80864542Hackathons are quickly growing beyond Red Bull- and Dorito-fueled code-fests into fertile grounds for new technologies and products that potentially could improve medicine and health care.

But beyond individual events, could hackathons signal the beginnings of a new ecosystem for medical innovation?

That’s what groups like MIT’s H@cking Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH)’s new iHub and the New Media Medicine group at the MIT Media Lab are betting on. By tapping the same creative entrepreneurial energy that hackathon culture has brought to the technology industry, they believe they can fundamentally reimagine health care, one device, app and system at a time.

“The Boston area is the most fertile ground for medical innovation you could ever imagine,” says Michael Docktor, MD, a gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s and one of the organizers, with the H@cking Medicine team, of this weekend’s Hacking Pediatrics hackathon. “We need to make the case with the local medical and technology community that hackathons are a viable way of innovating in this day and age, that this is the way we ought to be innovating.”

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