Stories about: fitness

Putting technology to work to get kids exercising

Obesity among children is on the rise, but just telling them to out and get more exercise doesn’t work well. Tracy Curran hopes technology and counseling can help. (Photo: Wagner T. Cassimiro "Aranha"/Flickr)

[Ed. Note: This is the second in a series about Children’s Hospital Boston staff who received Patient Services Research Grants in 2011. This grant program engages the professional staff in the Department of Patient Services in high quality pediatric research with the ultimate goal of improving child health]

We all look at babies and fall in love with their chubby little legs and paunchy bellies. (When my younger son was a baby, a friend often jokingly threatened to “eat him like a marshmallow.”)

Cute as it is in babies, though, children can’t afford to have that cushioning as they get older. Obesity threatens the future health of a whole generation of children, putting them at risk for a host of long-term health problems like high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes (increasingly starting in childhood) and cardiovascular disease. This is on top of more immediate problems like sleep apnea, asthma, low self-esteem, depression, fatty liver disease (which can turn into cirrhosis) and joint pain.

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