Stories about: gene sequencing

A perfect genetic hit: New gene mutation implicated in rare congenital diarrhea

Normal intestinal organoids (left) in contrast to intestinal organoids derived from patients (right) with a newly-discovered gene mutation linked to congenital diarrhea.
Normal intestinal organoids (left) in contrast to intestinal organoids derived from patients (right) with a newly-discovered gene mutation linked to congenital diarrhea.

When the 1-year-old boy arrived from overseas, he was relying on total parenteral nutrition — a way of bypassing the digestive system to provide nutrients and calories completely intravenously — to survive. From the time of his birth, he had experienced unexplainable diarrhea. Answers were desperately needed.

Sequencing his genes in search of clues, neonatologists and collaborators at the Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children’s Hospital identified a new gene mutation responsible for chronic congenital diarrhea — even finding a similar mutation in two other children as well.

Using patient-derived intestinal organoids in the laboratory, the team discovered that the newly-identified gene mutation, WNT2B, appears to stifle intestinal stem cells’ normal function and growth. The findings were published in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

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Why do some people with cystic fibrosis live much longer than others?

Lung tissue, which can be compromised by the genetic disorder known as cystic fibrosis, is seen under microscopic view.
Lung tissue under microscope.

The answer may be hidden in their genes.

Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disorder caused by genetic mutations that disrupt the normal movement of chloride in and out of cells. Among other health problems, cystic fibrosis compromises the lungs’ ability to fight infection and breathe efficiently, making it the most lethal genetic disease in the Caucasian population. Patients have an average lifespan of just 30 to 40 years.

Despite this narrow average lifespan, there is a big range in how severely cystic fibrosis (CF) affects the lungs and other organs depending on an individual’s specific genetic variation, and even in how long patients sharing the same, most common genetic mutation are able to survive with CF.

This led researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital to wonder if other genetic mutations could be protective against CF’s effects. Recent findings published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology suggest that may be the case.

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