Stories about: genome-wide association studies

Why I’m tall and you’re short: GIANT effort finds rare, potent height genes

height genes that make us tall or short

Height is the “poster child” of complex genetic traits, meaning that it’s influenced by multiple genetic variants working together. Because height is easy to measure, it’s a relatively simple model for understanding traits produced by not one gene, but many.

“Mastering the complex genetics of height may give us a blueprint for studying multifactorial disorders that have eluded our complete understanding, such as diabetes and heart disease,” says Joel Hirschhorn, MD, PhD, a pediatric endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Hirschhorn chairs the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) Consortium, an international group that’s just probed more deeply into the genetics of height than ever before. Its findings, reported today in Nature, reveal previously unknown biological pathways tied to height.

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Tool helps interpret subtle DNA variants from genome-wide association studies

Genome-wide association studies are huge undertakings that compare the genomes of large populations. They can turn up thousands to tens of thousands of genetic variants associated with disease. But which GWAS variants really matter?

That question becomes exponentially harder when the variants lie in the vast stretches of DNA that don’t encode proteins, but instead have regulatory functions.

“It’s hard to know which hits are causal hits, and which are just going along for the ride,” says Vijay Sankaran, MD, PhD, a pediatric hematologist/oncologist at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and an associate member of the Broad Institute.

Reporting in Cell, Sankaran’s team and two other groups at the Broad Institute describe a new tool that can looks at hundreds of thousands of genetic elements at once to pinpoint variants that truly affect gene expression or function. Called the massively parallel reporter assay (MPRA), it could help reveal subtle genetic influences on diseases and traits.

In Sankaran’s case, the MPRA is helping him understand how common variants contribute to blood disorders in children. “Most of the common variation is just tuning genetic function,” he says. “Just slightly, not turning it on or off, but actually just tuning it like a dimmer switch.”

The above video explains how the assay works – via DNA “barcodes.” Read more on the Broad Institute’s blog, Broad Minded.

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Gene sifting for gene snipping: GWAS as a source of gene editing targets

Magnifying glass people GWAS gene editing
(Digital Storm/Shutterstock)

When genome-wide association studies (GWAS) first started appearing 10 years ago, they were heralded as the answer to connecting human genetic variation to human disease. These kinds of studies—which sift population-level genetic data—have revealed thousands of genetic variations associated with diseases, from age-related macular degeneration to obesity to diabetes.

However, thus far GWAS have largely come up short when it comes to finding new therapies. Few significant drug targets have come to light based on GWAS data (though some studies suggest that these studies could help drug makers find new uses for existing molecules).

Part of the problem may be that, until now, the right tools haven’t been available to exploit GWAS data. But a few recent studies—including two out of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center—have used GWAS data to identify therapeutically promising targets, and then manipulated those targets using the growing arsenal of gene editing methods.

Does this mean that GWAS’ day has finally come?

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Connecting unexpected dots between cancer and diabetes

George Daley and his lab may have found a new way to connect the dots between cancer and diabetes. (michelle.gray/Flickr)

Most of us think about cancer as a disease of genes gone awry – of mutations, deletions, duplications, etc. causing unchecked cell growth.

But could you also view cancer as a metabolic disorder, like type 2 diabetes? George Daley and his lab in the Stem Cell Transplantation Program at Children’s have found some intriguing molecular links that make this a plausible idea.

While it’s not yet clear what this means for patients with either disease, the findings help untangle some very perplexing data about human genetics and diabetes risk, and could change doctors’ thinking about the treatment of both conditions down the road.

Scientists have long known that cancerous and healthy cells don’t use sugar in the same ways.

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