Stories about: Hacking Pediatrics

Alexa: How are smart speakers helping patients, caregivers and clinicians?

Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri, emcees the Voice.Health Summit
Susan Bennett, the original voice of Apple’s Siri, emcees the 2018 Voice.Health Summit. (PHOTOS COURTESY IDHA/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

Sarah Lindenauer is product and portfolio manager for the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Where can you hear the voice of Siri introducing a keynote speaker? Or see the developers of the first healthcare skill for voice present alongside leading pharmaceutical and health insurance companies? Experience demos of cutting-edge voice technologies from 20+ startups from around the world, in simulated healthcare environments?

It all went down October 17th in Boston at the Voice.Health Summit, presented by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) as a run-up to the Connected Health Conference. More than 300 leading innovators in voice tech in healthcare came from around the world for a day of immersion and to answer the question, “What’s next?”

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Post-millennial hackers build hospitals of the future in Minecraft

From the long line stretching down the hall at the Kids-Only Minecraft Hackathon, a 7-year-old could be heard shouting, “Would it be helpful if I gave access to others on my server?”

Parents perked up with curiosity. Many of the kids, waiting to sign in to create the hospital of the future, looked even more excited. With a ton of enthusiasm and some impressive design skills, the kids got to work on their laptops and tablets re-designing the hospitals of our future, one digital brick at a time. The first-ever Kids-Only Minecraft Hackathon was well underway.

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From NICU dad to citizen scientist: Creating a smart pulse oximeter

Morris Family
Jon and Sarah Morris with 7-year-old twins Drew and Emma

When Sarah and Jon Morris’ twins were born nine weeks early, they embarked on a journey largely dictated by their children’s medical needs. While son Drew was thriving, daughter Emma was severely compromised and was transferred to Boston Children’s Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). “We felt powerless,” remembers Jon. “Every time we thought we had made progress, we had a setback. It’s always two steps forward, one step back in the NICU. That backwards step always hit the hardest.”

After 296 days at Boston Children’s, Emma went home tethered to breathing and feeding tubes. The Morrises had a pulse oximeter at home to regularly test Emma’s blood oxygen level.

There were frustrating limitations to Emma’s oximeter:

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Accelerating health care advances: Hacking the hackathon

Hackathon cartoon-Irina Bezyanova-ShutterstockMichael Docktor, MD, a gastroenterologist in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, is passionate about technology and taking care of sick children. He is clinical director of Innovation, director of Clinical Mobile Solutions and an original co-founder of Hacking Pediatrics.

Health care hackathons have proliferated over the last three years, perhaps nowhere more than at Boston’s academic medical centers. After three years of organizing and running Hacking Pediatrics events, and seeing nearly 40 amazing ideas generated by hundreds of innovators, we felt that the experience needed to evolve.

Armed with data and a few battle scars, as any startup might incur, we pivoted and sought to, essentially, hack the hack.

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8 winning innovations at Hacking Pediatrics

general hackersHacking Pediatrics, now in its third year, continues to experiment with its format. 2015’s “Mashup” had a greater focus on partnerships, curation and delivering value to innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital. The brunt of the idea pitching and team formation took place in advance, allowing the event, on November 14, to be collapsed into one day.

The Hacking Pediatrics team (Kate Donovan, Mike Docktor, Meg McCabe, Cassandra Bannos and Leila Amerling) brokered collaborations with a dozen industry partners such as Microsoft, Cerner, Box, CVS Health and Boston Scientific. Over the course of a hectic 12-hour day, they worked with 17 teams of Boston Children’s innovators and experts from partner organizations who presented their final ideas to a panel of judges.

In another change for 2015, the Hacking Pediatrics team issued nine awards — but no immediate prizes. This was meant to incentivize teams to continue to work and meet milestones to earn real rewards, like a $10,000 design prize offered up by design firm Mad*Pow.

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A banquet of tools for health tech innovators

Tools-Shutterstock-donatas1205-croppedWant to hack something in medicine? Vendors are increasingly eager to contribute their tools to problem-solving teams, like those who will gather November 14 for Boston Children’s Hospital’s Hacking Pediatrics. Seeing an array of tools presented at a showcase at Boston Children’s last week, I felt excited about the possibilities ahead.

Here are a few tools that can help innovators improve health care for patients, caregivers and providers.

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My work, my life: Michael J. Docktor, MD

Michael J. Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of Innovation and director of Clinical Mobile Solutions, is also a practicing gastroenterologist, a proud father of two and a passionate mobile-and-digital health trailblazer. An original co-founder of Hacking Pediatrics, Docktor’s goal is to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship, consumer technology, design and clinical pain points.

Hover over the images and icons in the photo below to learn more about Docktor’s professional and personal life, favorite gadgets and more.

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What happens after a medical hackathon? Lessons from two winning projects

Judy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

hackathons
Hackathons create ideas and excitement, but then reality sets in.

Much has been written about the successes that result from medical hackathons, in which people from across the health care ecosystem converge to solve challenges. For example, PillPack, which formed out of MIT Hacking Medicine, recently closed an $8.75 million funding round. But is this a realistic snapshot of what happens after a hackathon? We took a look at two of the 16 teams that competed at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Hacking Pediatrics last year.

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Hacking our way to vaccine compliance: The birth of WhatVax

Gomez's team at work on a platform for vaccine tracking and orderingEva Gómez, RN-BC, MSN, CPN, is a staff development specialist in Clinical Education and Informatics 
at Boston Children’s Hospital. She and Tami Chase, RN, nurse manager at Martha Eliot Health Center, received the Springboard Prize from Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program at last month’s Hacking Pediatrics.

For months, my colleague Tami Chase and I had been experiencing a big pain point in our patient-care process: the complicated and time-consuming task of ordering vaccines—a task that requires providers and nurses to memorize or figure out complex algorithms based on variables like patient age, ethnicity and medical/family history. There are many vaccines and formulations, and if vaccine supplies are used incorrectly, we are less able to order free vaccines from federal and state sources. We’re then forced to purchase vaccines privately—tapping hospital funds that could be used for many other worthy projects.

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Hacking Pediatrics 2.0 in tweets

Hackers at Hacking PediatricsParents, clinicians, app developers, designers and more had 18 hours to prototype digital healthcare solutions at Hacking Pediatrics, produced by Boston Children’s Hospital and MIT Hacking Medicine. To accompany our earlier post, we created this Storify.

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