Stories about: haptics

Skin-like material can ‘sense’ if surgeons get off track

Experimental setup for calibrating the sensing skin. Each sensor pad is lowered onto the indentation surface placed on a weight-measuring scale. Changes in the channel resistance are processed through analog signal conditioning and a DAC board, and recorded on a computer. (J Neurosurgery: Pediatrics)
Experimental setup for calibrating the sensing skin. Each sensor pad is lowered onto the indentation surface placed on a weight-measuring scale. Changes in the channel resistance are processed through analog signal conditioning and a DAC board, and recorded on a computer. (Images: J Neurosurgery: Pediatrics)
When surgeons perform image-guided minimally invasive procedures using an endoscope, some aspects of visualization and image quality are typically compromised as compared with open surgeries in which the physician can peer into the body. However, a new pressure-sensing material, placed over an endoscope, may someday provide surgeons with additional guidance and protect healthy tissue during these procedures.

“Neurosurgeons, especially pediatric neurosurgeons, are increasingly using neuroendoscopy to perform minimally invasive brain and spine surgery,” notes Patrick Codd, MD, from the Department of Neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital, who was the lead author on a study evaluating this new material.

“Whenever you move to image-guided minimally invasive surgery, there is typically a tradeoff between the resolution of the image and the field of view,” where you have one but not the other, says Pierre Dupont, PhD, chief of Pediatric Cardiac Bioengineering at Boston Children’s and senior author on the study.

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