Stories about: healthcare innovation

What do hospitals want from prospective digital health partners?

how digital health startups can better approach hospitals
How digital health startups can better approach hospitals.

How can the growing number of digital health startups sell their products to large-scale healthcare enterprises? Earlier this year, Rock Health, a San Francisco-based venture fund dedicated to digital health, conducted 30-minute interviews with executives at multiple startups and a few large healthcare organizations. They identified several key sticking points: navigating the internal complexities of hospitals, finding the right buyer, identifying the product’s value proposition and relevance to the hospital and avoiding “death by pilot.”

Now, in a Rock Health podcast, John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator and Adam Landman, MD, MS, MIS, MHS, Chief Information Officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and part of its Innovation Hub, offer further tips from the inside. They were hosted by Rock Health’s director of research, Megan Zweig.

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Dock Health’s shared ‘to do’ list for clinical teams — so basic, so necessary

Dock Health - a shared to-do list for clinical teams - could ease clinical burnout

While something as simple as a “to-do list” might seem trivial, a secure hub to store, prioritize and assign clinical and administrative tasks could be game-changing in healthcare.

Michael Docktor, MD, of Boston Children’s Hospital made this case yesterday at the Health 2.0 Conference in Santa Clara, Calif. He demonstrated Dock Health, a secure iOS mobile and web application that helps medical teams manage the numerous tasks that fall under clinical care. The idea was born in his gastroenterology practice at Boston Children’s and was incubated by the hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA).

“In an average day in clinic, I might see 15 patients and get 75 emails, 10 secure messages, three pages and five [electronic medical record] messages in my inbox,” Docktor writes on Medium. “Not too long ago, some emails were from frustrated colleagues, asking me to do something for a second or third time. Sadly, some were from parents of my patients, kindly reminding me that they were sitting in the lab waiting for the orders I forgot to place or trying to book their colonoscopy, for which I had forgotten to submit the form.”

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Building a clinician-centric healthcare accelerator

busy doctors need a boost from healthcare accelerators

Who better to innovate in healthcare than doctors, nurses and others on the front lines? They know what’s broken. They want to fix it. And they understand healthcare’s complexity. Some have taken part in hackathons and pitch competitions. But once these events are over, most find they’re too busy to develop their ideas and that they lack the necessary business expertise.

In Harvard Business Review this week, leaders of the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital, with Kevin Churchwell, MD, executive VP of health affairs, describe how (and why) the hospital formed an in-house accelerator program in 2016. In a single year, the program engaged more than 300 clinicians, researchers and administrators in more than 25 clinical departments, offering custom, “just in time” support. Nine projects were accelerated, including three new startups.

A central tactic is the “Opportunity SPRINT,” a 90-minute triage session that brings hospital teams together with business strategists, subject matter experts, technologists and, sometimes, parents and patients. Even when an idea isn’t immediately embraced, SPRINTs are designed to be educational and constructive, inspiring clinicians to reimagine their idea and come back with a better one.

Read more in HBR and check out IDHA’s portfolio.

 

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Bringing voice technology to healthcare: Hacking with Amazon’s Alexa

voice technology healthcare
Kate Donovan, clinical advisor to IDHA, conducts a simulated inpatient demo of Alexa.

Earlier this spring, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation and Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) released KidsMD for Amazon’s Alexa, the voice technology system’s first healthcare “skill.” It offers simple health advice for parents inquiring about their child’s fever and medication doses at home. But fever is just the beginning. Where else in a patient’s journey could voice be leveraged?

In collaboration with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Simulator Program (SIMPeds), IDHA brought Alexa to a two-part mini-hackathon on May 25. Patients and their families, clinicians, developers and researchers were invited to watch and join demonstrations of voice technology across the hospital. In the breakout hack sessions that followed, participants brainstormed future applications for voice at Boston Children’s.

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Defining the ROI for health care innovation

Naomi Fried, PhD, is Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Return on innovation ROI

When people hear about ROI, they often think of financial returns and “return on investment.” But, in my world, ROI is actually “return on innovation.” While the return on innovation can be financial, it can also take many other forms. Here are my top five.

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What is meaningful patient engagement?

"Engagement" can take many forms, not all of them authentic. (Jim Bowen/Flickr)
‘Engagement’ can take many forms, not all of them authentic. (Jim Bowen/Flickr)

Richard Antonelli, MD, is a primary care pediatrician and medical director of Integrated Care and Physician Relations and Outreach at Boston Children’s Hospital. He also co-chairs the Task Force on Care Coordination for Children with Behavioral Health Needs, a group within the Massachusetts Child Health Quality Coalition.

Tools and apps designed to engage children and families in their care are proliferating. But are they meaningful? At its best, patient engagement isn’t just technology that brings lab results and medication reminders to a patient’s or parent’s iPhone. It’s about creating a relationship in which families are able to specify their care needs; clinicians and families learn from each other; and patients and families are able to manage their own care.

Patients and families are not just consumers of health care—they define goals and priorities. Their insights are essential.

A powerful tool for supporting a meaningful family/provider relationship is the Care Map. It was developed by Cristin Lind, parent of a child with special needs, who found herself in the role of care coordinator,

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Top 10 science and innovation trends for 2013

(Garry Knight/Flickr)

Vector has been deliberating about its predictions for 2013, consulting its many informants. Here’s where we’re putting our money this year; if you have other ideas, scroll to the bottom and let us know.

Genome sequencing scaling up at health care institutions

Last year we predicted genome sequencing’s entry into the clinic; this could be the year it goes viral. Technology companies with ever-faster sequencers and academic medical centers are teaming up at a brisk pace to offer genomic tests to patients. Just in the past two weeks, a deal was announced between The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and BGI-Shenzhen to sequence pediatric brain tumors; Partners HealthCare and Illumina Inc. announced a network of genomic testing laboratories;

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Empowering patients: Intelligent devices and apps for better health

Melinda Tang, MEng, is a software developer for the Innovation Acceleration Program at  Boston Children’s Hospital.

When children return home from the hospital after surgery, parents can be overwhelmed by the written information and instructions for follow-up. At the MIT Media Lab’s Health and Wellness Hackathon earlier this year, the focus was on empowering patients to take an active role in their health. As my colleague Brian Rosman described, our team from Boston Children’s Hospital attended and spent two weeks developing “Ralph,” a mobile application for managing post-operative care that incorporates an avatar and features of gaming to engage and motivate children to follow their regimen. I was one of the primary programmers for our group.

We won third place, working alongside five other talented teams. Here are some snapshots of what they were up to — helping patients manage asthma, diabetes, pain, cardiac rehab and more.

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Hacking our way to a new mobile app

Brian Rosman holds up a tablet app he and a team of Children's and MIT Media Lab staff developed over the past two weeks during the Health and Wellness Hackathon

At 10 a.m. he’s directing two actors on set, at 10:34 a.m. he’s filling up a catheter and at 11:01 a.m. he’s gushing about the importance of pediatric avatars. Brian Rosman, a Robotic Surgery Research Fellow in the Department of  Urology at Children’s Hospital Boston, has been working non-stop at the MIT Media Lab’s Health & Wellness hackathon to create a new app for post-operative care. His duties have included directing a video about the app, rounding up realistic props and explaining how the program works to judges and hackathon attendees.

Rosman and his team of coders, clinicians and industry professionals are competing against five other teams for a $10,000 prize awarded to the best open source healthcare application.

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Top 10 science and clinical innovation trends: Looking forward to 2012

Here once again is Vector’s take on some exciting trends we’ve been watching in the pediatric health arena and what we expect to see more of this year. If you’ve got others to propose, scroll to the bottom and let us know!

Genomics is starting to provide clinically actionable information (Michael Knowles/Flickr)

Whole-genome sequencing enters the clinic
In 2000, with our genome deciphered, the Human Genome Project promised to transform medicine, predicting and preventing all that ails us. The project spawned next-generation technologies, accelerated the development of bioinformatics and shaped new perspectives on research. But if, say, a stroke patient was asked the question, “Is your life any better than 10 years ago thanks to advent of genomics?” the answer would have to be “no.” Hence the New York Times’s assertion in 2010 that the project yielded few new cures.

Now that paradigm seems to be shifting. Whole-genome sequencing has begun moving into the clinic, sleuthing out problems, offering hope for a medicine that’s more effective and more personal. 2011 saw genomic information provide biochemical insights timely and actionable enough to improve the treatment of individuals with cancer and dystonia, and, in a case at Children’s, failure to thrive and severe kidney calcification.

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