Stories about: hemoglobin

“Vampires” may have been real people with this blood disorder

Mural of Vlad the Impaler, who was accused of being a vampire. Perhaps, instead, he suffered from a blood disorder called porphyria.Porphyrias, a group of eight known blood disorders, affect the body’s molecular machinery for making heme, which is a component of the oxygen-transporting protein, hemoglobin. When heme binds with iron, it gives blood its hallmark red color.

The different genetic variations that affect heme production give rise to different clinical presentations of porphyria — including one form that may be responsible for vampire folklore.

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Sickle cell disease and the thalassemias: The advantages of staying forever young

Flipping a single molecular switch could turn off the mutation that causes sickle cell diseae. Stuart Orkin has already done it in mice. (CDC PHIL)

What if we really could turn our bodies’ clocks back? In some cases, that could be a really good thing. Take sickle cell disease. A scourge of tens of thousands worldwide, it stems from a genetic defect in hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells.

Normally, our bodies can produce two forms of hemoglobin: adult hemoglobin, the form susceptible to the sickle cell mutation; and fetal hemoglobin, which is largely produced during development and for a short time after birth. Our bodies finish making the switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin production by about four to six months old – the same time frame when children with the sickle cell mutation first start to show symptoms of the disease.

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