Stories about: hereditary xerocytosis

Teaching an old drug a new trick to treat an ultra-rare red-blood-cell disease

Failed sickle-cell drug learns a new trick: hereditary xerocytosis

The National Institutes of Health maintains a library of drugs, the Clinical Collection, that are safe for humans but failed in clinical trials or didn’t make it to the market for other reasons. These compounds, numbering 450 to date, are just sitting on the shelf, waiting for a researcher to identify a disease process they might treat.

Repurposing such drugs could potentially save the pharmaceutical industry time and money. Getting a new drug from R&D to market currently takes $2 to 3 billion and 13 to 15 years. In contrast, some estimate that repurposing a safe drug could cost just $300 million and take just 6.5 years.

Pfizer, one of the biggest pharma companies in the world, saw the appeal. It just launched SpringWorks Therapeutics, a mission-driven company dedicated to reviving shelved drugs to treat underserved diseases. In its pipeline are experimental therapies to treat four diseases that currently have no cure.

One of the earliest-stage candidates is senicapoc.

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