Stories about: Hidde Ploegh

‘Nanobodies’ from alpacas could help bring CAR T-cell therapy to solid tumors

These alpacas produce the unusually small antibodies (nanobodies) used in a new form of CAR T-cell therapy
Like other alpacas, as well as camels and llamas, Bryson (left) and Sanchez produce unusually small antibodies that could have a role in cancer immunotherapy. (PHOTO COURTESY HIDDE PLOEGH / BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

In 1989, two undergraduate students at the Free University of Brussels were asked to test frozen blood serum from camels, and stumbled on a previously unknown kind of antibody. It was a miniaturized version of a human antibody, made up only of two heavy protein chains, rather than two light and two heavy chains. As they eventually reported, the antibodies’ presence was confirmed not only in camels, but also in llamas and alpacas.

Fast forward 30 years. In the journal PNAS this week, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and MIT show that these mini-antibodies, shrunk further to create so-called nanobodies, may help solve a problem in the cancer field: making CAR T-cell therapies work in solid tumors.

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