Stories about: HLHS

New and improved device shows promise for pediatric heart surgery

2000px-Hypoplastic_left_heart_syndrome.svg
In the Norwood procedure for HLHS, a graft creates a conduit between the right ventricle and the aorta, diverting blood flow from the underdeveloped left ventricle. But that graft can wear out. (BLUE represents oxygen-poor blood; RED, oxygen-rich blood; PURPLE, a mixture of the two.)

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a rare but serious form of congenital heart disease that leaves the left pumping chamber (ventricle) of the heart severely underdeveloped. Children born with HLHS can’t pump enough oxygenated blood from their heart to the rest of their body and need surgery as soon as possible to survive. Treatment ultimately involves three corrective surgeries throughout the infant and toddler years.

The first surgery, known as the Norwood procedure, is the riskiest of the three. Ideally performed within the first week of life, the procedure re-routes the heart’s plumbing to ensure enough oxygenated blood is circulated while the child grows big enough for the second surgery. A device called a graft is used to connect the fully-functional right ventricle to the aorta, bypassing the stunted left ventricle, for proper blood flow. However, with each ventricular contraction, the graft gets squeezed, which can cause it to shift or lose its shape over time. Repeat interventions to adjust the graft are often needed.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Building a whole heart for children born with half: Q+A with a cardiac surgeon

Could a new surgical approach help children like Lucas get the rest of their heart back?

Our pediatric heart surgeons are used to pushing the envelope. Last month we reported on a new kind of heart valve for children with mitral valve defects that can expand as they grow. Now the same team reports 10 years of experience trying to rebuild a lost half of the heart for children born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a devastating, life-threatening defect.

The new strategy, called staged left ventricle recruitment (SLVR), seeks to harness a child’s native capacity for growth and healing to encourage the undersized left ventricle to grow, giving the child a fully functional heart.

I sat down with Sitaram M. Emani, MD—a cardiac surgeon in the Heart Center at Boston Children’s Hospital and lead author on the SLVR paper—to learn more. 

Read Full Story | 1 Comment | Leave a Comment