Stories about: Human Neuron Core

Prescriptions for accelerating neuroscience translation: Q&A with Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD

Mustafa Sahin Translational Neuroscience CenterMustafa Sahin, MD, PhD, a neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, directs the Translational Neuroscience Center, which he founded several years ago to accelerate neuroscience research to the clinic. He also directs the hospital’s Translational Research Program. In this interview with Boston Children’s Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO), Sahin talks about his motivations as a clinician-scientist and how he works with industry partners to move discoveries forward.

What drives you as a scientist? 

What drives me as a scientist has changed over the course of my career. It was my fascination with experimentation that first got me interested in biology. In high school, I took vials of fruit flies to a radiation oncology department and tested the effects of radiation on the mutation rate. When I came to the U.S. to study biochemistry in college, I was drawn to the mysteries of the brain. While my PhD and postdoctoral work continued on very fundamental questions about how neurons connect to each other, advances in genetics and neuroscience allowed me to bring rigorous basic science approaches to clinical questions. So more and more, my science is driven by a need to bring treatments to the patients I see in the clinic. Fortunately, this is no longer a long-term, aspirational goal, but something within reach in my career.

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CDKL5: Understanding rare epilepsies, patient by patient, neuron by neuron

CDKL5 epilepsy
Haley with her parents and neurologist Heather Olson (right)

Nine-year-old Haley Hilt has had intractable seizures all her life. Though she cannot speak, she communicates volumes with her eyes. Using a tablet she controls with her gaze, she can tell her parents when her head hurts and has shown that she knows her letters, numbers and shapes.

Haley is one of a growing group of children who are advancing the science around CDKL5 epilepsy, Haley’s newly recognized genetic disorder. When Boston Children’s Hospital geneticist Joan Stoler, MD, diagnosed Haley in 2009, there were perhaps 100 cases known in the world; today, there are estimated to be a few thousand. Haley’s neurologist, Heather Olson, MD, leads a CDKL5 Center of Excellence at the hospital that is bringing the condition into better view.

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