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SHRINE: Clinical & population research by the numbers

Clinical research is all about numbers. A new informatics network called SHRINE could help make it easier to get find out if the numbers of patients are there to answer complex questions. (victoriapeckham/Flickr)
Ed. note: This morning at 8:15 EDT, Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, will tell the audience at TEDMED 2013 about his goal of using every clinical visit to advance medical science. 

To preview his talk, we’ve updated a past Vector story about SHRINE, a system Kohane helped develop to allow scientists to use clinical data from multiple hospitals for research.

Clinical research really comes down to a numbers game. And those numbers can be the bane of the clinical researcher. If there aren’t enough patients in a study, its results could be statistically meaningless. But getting enough patients for a study, particularly for rare diseases, can be a daunting challenge.

The Shared Research Information Network (or SHRINE) could help solve this vexing problem. Developed through Harvard Catalyst by a team led by Isaac “Zak” Kohane, MD, PhD, director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Informatics Program, SHRINE links the clinical databases of participating Harvard-affiliated hospitals—currently Boston Children’s Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital—letting researchers at those hospitals see how many patients from those hospitals meet selected criteria.

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SHRINE: Clinical and population research by the numbers

Clinical research is all about numbers. A new informatics network called SHRINE could help make it easier to get find out if the numbers of patients are there to answer complex questions. (victoriapeckham/Flickr)

As we’ve discussed before, clinical research really comes down to a numbers game. But getting enough patients for a study, particularly for rare diseases, can be a daunting challenge. Similarly, it can be hard to tell whether observations made in just two or three patients, say a possible new medication interaction or a new diagnostic presentation, are part of a trend – one that’s worth grant money to study.

The Shared Research Information Network (or SHRINE) could help solve these vexing problems by mining data across hospitals. Developed through Harvard Catalyst by a team led by Isaac “Zak” Kohane, director of the Children’s Hospital Informatics Program, SHRINE links the clinical databases of participating Harvard-affiliated hospitals – currently Children’s, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital – letting researchers see the numbers of patients seen at those hospitals who meet selected criteria.

Why is this important?

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment