Stories about: imaging

Flipping the switch on tumor growth

Pictures of angiogenic tumor cells
Time-lapse imaging can reveal tell-tale changes in cellular behaviors associated with tumor growth.

Without a blood supply, a tumor can remain dormant and harmless. But new blood vessel growth from an existing vessel, a process called angiogenesis, is a hallmark of both benign and malignant tumors. During angiogenesis, blood vessels invade tumors and activate them, fueling their growth.

Now, Marsha A. Moses, PhD, who directs the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and members of her laboratory have revealed that a specialized imaging system can detect changes in cell behaviors. These changes predict when tumors are leaving a state of dormancy and becoming more likely to grow.

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Maternal-infant health research will bring placenta into view

placental health
A pre-1858 schematic of the placental circulation from Gray’s Anatomy (Wikimedia Commons).

The afterbirth has generally been an afterthought, but that’s about to change.

This week, 19 research centers were awarded grants from NIH’s Human Placenta Project, which is seeking to learn more about the intricate organ that sustained us in the womb, the interface between us and our mothers.

A robust placenta is key to a healthy pregnancy and baby, but strangely, not much is actually known about it. “It’s a fascinating but very poorly understood structure,” says P. Ellen Grant, MD, who directs the Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging and Developmental Science Center at Boston Children’s Hospital and is leading one of the projects.

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3-D printed models may soon guide one-of-a-kind pediatric heart operations

Photo credit: Bryce Vickmark, MIT News
Photo credit: Bryce Vickmark, MIT News

No two hearts are alike. It sounds like poetry, but this adage takes on a special meaning for pediatric cardiac surgeons.

Children born with congenital heart disease have unique cardiac anatomies. To correct them, surgeons need a nuanced understanding of each structure and chamber of the heart, and for decades have relied on (increasingly sophisticated) imaging technology.

Soon, though, they will be able to touch, turn and view replicas of their patients’ hearts up close. Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and MIT have jointly designed a computer program that can convert MRI scans of a patient’s heart into 3-D physical models.

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Five cool medical innovations we saw last week

Last week, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program hosted a jam-packed Innovators’ Showcase where teams from around the hospital networked, traded ideas and showed off their projects. Here are a few Vector thinks are worth watching.

isotropic diffusion reveals information on axons on DTI1. An imaging ‘biomarker’ after concussion

Thirty percent of people who suffer a mild traumatic brain injury—a.k.a. concussion—have ongoing symptoms that can last months or years. If patients at risk could be identified, they could receive early interventions such as brain cooling and anti-seizure medications. New MRI protocols that can measure free, non-directional diffusion of water, coupled with sophisticated analytics, are achieving unprecedented pictures of what happens inside the brain after injury.

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Brain structural imaging: Gleaning more with math

MRI images showing isotropic diffusion in autism
A new MRI computational technology (above right) captures differences in water diffusion in the brain across a population of children with autism as compared with controls. This non-directional, “isotropic” diffusion pattern, not evident with conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), may be an indicator of brain inflammation.

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a form of magnetic resonance imaging, has become popular in neuroscience. By analyzing the direction of water diffusion in the brain, it can reveal the organization of bundles of nerve fibers, or axons, and how they connect—providing insight on conditions such as autism.

But conventional DTI has its limits. For example, when fibers cross, DTI can’t accurately analyze the signal: the different directions of water flow effectively cancel each other out. Given that an estimated 60 to 90 percent of voxels (cubic-millimeter sections of brain tissue) contain more than one fiber bundle, this isn’t a minor problem. In addition, conventional DTI can’t interpret water flow that lacks directionality, such as that within the brain’s abundant glial cells or the freely diffusing water that results from inflammation—so misses part of the story.

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Bringing MRI to vulnerable newborns

Premature newborn in small-bore MRI magnet-courtesy Cincinnati Children's
A 4.2-lb baby girl in the new 1.5 Tesla MRI magnet, designed for use in the NICU. (Images courtesy of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center)
Charles Dumoulin, PhD, is the director of the Imaging Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and a professor of pediatric radiology at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He led the team of scientists and engineers from CCHMC’s Imaging Research Center who won the Clinical Innovation Award at Boston Children’s Hospital’s National Innovation Pediatric Summit + Awards in September.

Experience suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MR techniques such as spectroscopy and diffusion imaging offer substantial benefits when diagnosing problems in premature babies. However, today’s MR systems poses significant logistical barriers to imaging these infants. We have been working to change that.

MRI provides an unparalleled ability to visualize anatomy without the hazards of ionizing radiation. Yet premature and sick babies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are usually too delicate to leave the unit. The few babies who receive MRI today must be accompanied by NICU staff during transport to and from the Radiology Department. This process is often a multi-hour ordeal and reduces the staff available to care for other babies in the NICU. Moreover, infants must be imaged in an adult-sized MRI scanner

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Peeking into the black box of lung ventilation

As the lungs expand, the glow blue in this movie made using EIT; areas that are underinflated appear red.
Can we monitor a child's lungs when they're on a ventilator without actually taking a picture? Yes, with a technology called EIT; click the image above to see for yourself. (Courtesy Camille Gómez-Laberge)

Every year, thousands of children in intensive care units across the United States are put on mechanical ventilation to help them breathe. But while this technology has saved countless lives, it can also cause or worsen lung injury.

“A child’s injured lungs don’t often inflate uniformly under ventilation,” says Gerhard Wolf, a critical care doctor in Children’s Hospital Boston’s Department of Anesthesia. “So one part of the lung may be nearly collapsed while another is overinflated. We need to be able to see that so we don’t cause further damage.”

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