Stories about: immune deficiency

So far, so good for gene therapy patient Emir Seyrek

Emir Seyrek gene therapy Wiskott-Aldrich ThrivingRemember Emir Seyrek, the Turkish boy who last year was the first patient in gene therapy trial for a genetic immunodeficiency called Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome? Emir traveled back to the U.S. earlier this month for an annual follow-up visit with his care team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. The news was quite good.

“Emir is the star of the trial,” Sung-Yun Pai, MD—a Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s gene therapy and immunodeficiency transplant specialist and lead (along with David Williams, MD, and Luigi Notarangelo, MD) of the U.S. arm of the trial—tells our sister blog, Thriving. “He has the highest platelet count of all of the children who have gone through gene therapy with this vector so far. His immune function is excellent, and we have no worries whatsoever from a bleeding standpoint. He’s perfectly safe to play like a normal child.”

Learn more about Emir’s progress on Thriving.

 

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Gene therapy gets in the ring with another disease

Emir Seyrek Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome WAS gene therapy Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center
Emir Seyrek was the first patient with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome to be treated in the U.S. in an international gene therapy trial.

Seeing that his mother, Kadriye, wasn’t looking, Emir Seyrek got an impish grin on his face, the kind only a two-year-old can have. He quietly dumped his bowl of dry cereal out on his bed and, with another quick look towards his mother, proceeded to pulverize the flakes to dust with his toy truck. The rest of the room burst out laughing while his mother scolded him. Despite the scolding, though, the impish grin remained.

It was hard to believe that he arrived from Turkey six months earlier fighting a host of bacterial and viral infections. Emir was born with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a genetic immunodeficiency that left him with a defective immune system. He was here because he was the first patient—of two so far—to take part in an international trial of a new gene therapy treatment for WAS at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. And that day he was having his final checkup at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Clinical and Translational Study Unit before going home.

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Customized cell therapy for untreatable diseases: Your tax dollars at work

Leonard Zon (top) and Massachusetts Lt. Governor Timothy Murray in the Stem Cell Program's zebrafish facility. (Courtesy MLSC)
Ed. Note: Leonard Zon, MD, is founder and director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Stem Cell Program, which yesterday was awarded $4 million by the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center to build the Children’s Center for Cell Therapy.

As a hematologist, I see all too many children battling blood disorders that are essentially untreatable. Babies with immune deficiencies living life in a virtual bubble, hospitalized again and again for infections their bodies can’t fight. Children disabled by strokes caused by sickle cell disease, or suffering through sickle cell crises that drug treatments can’t completely prevent. Children whose only recourse is to risk a bone marrow transplant—if a suitably matched donor can even be found.

Over the past 20 years, my lab and that of George Daley, MD, PhD, at Boston Children’s Hospital have worked hard to give these children a one-time, potentially curative option—a treatment that begins with patients’ own cells and doesn’t require finding a match.

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Gene therapy: Two years and holding

Agustín Cáceres, once a virtual "bubble boy," is no longer on infectious disease precautions.

For the Cáceres family of Argentina, it’s a joyous holiday homecoming. Agustín, who received gene therapy at 5½ months of age, journeyed with his family to Boston for a check-up and got a clean bill of health.

Agustín was born with the rare immune-deficiency disorder SCID-X1. More popularly known as “bubble boy” disease, it left him defenseless against infections, unable to make enough T-cells to fight them off. His baptism was the only time his family could come near him, all wearing masks, gloves and gowns. His infancy was spent in isolation with his mother.

Now, at age 2½, Agustín has been cleared to go to nursery school, ride a bus and attend large family gatherings without fear of contracting a life-threatening infection. When we caught up with him, he was chasing and tumbling with his older brother Jeremías while waiting to bid farewell to his care team.

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A new start for gene therapy for “bubble boy” disease: First U.S.-treated patient doing well

The first U.S.-treated patient with his parents. Photo: Patrick Bibbins

Until this month, Agustín Cáceres’s baptism was the only time his family could come close to him. Everyone had to wear masks, gloves and gowns.

After that, he went into isolation, along with his mother Marcela, who came out only for meals. His father Alberto, and his four-year-old brother Jeremías, kept to a separate bedroom. Jeremías had to stop attending nursery school, for fear he’d bring home an infection his baby brother might catch. When Agustín’s relatives came to help out, they had to change their clothes and wash their hands, and couldn’t enter Agustín’s room.

Agustín, born in Argentina, has a form of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, or SCID-X1, better known as “bubble boy disease.”

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