Stories about: immunodeficiency

Advances in SCID (“bubble boy” disease): A Q&A with a child hematologist/oncologist

David Williams, Luigi Notarangelo and Sun-Yung PaiSung-Yun Pai, MD, a pediatric hematologist/oncologist at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, was lead author on two recent articles on severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) in The New England Journal of Medicine. The first reviewed outcomes after bone marrow transplantation; the second reported the first results of a new international gene therapy trial for X-linked SCID. Here, she discusses what’s known to date about these therapies.

Q: What is SCID?

A: SCID is a group of disorders that compromise the blood’s T cells, a key component of the immune system that helps the body fight common viral infections, other opportunistic infections and fungal infections. T-cells are also important for the development of antibody responses to bacteria and other microorganisms. A baby born with SCID appears healthy at birth, but once the maternal antibodies that the baby is born with start to wane, the infant is at risk for life-threatening infections. Unless diagnosed and treated—with a stem cell transplant from a healthy donor or a more experimental therapy like gene therapy—babies with SCID typically die before their first birthday.

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Stem cells offer answers about a devastating brain infection—and a new view of the immune system

Why do some children develop severe encephalitis from herpes simplex virus 1, a virus that's usually innocuous? (Fred Murphy/CDC/Wikimedia Commons)

Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is one of those viruses that’s found nearly everywhere: almost 60 percent of the U.S. population has been infected by it. Usually it causes little more than cold sores or occasional genital herpes.

But for a handful of children, it’s the source of one of the most devastating brain infections known—herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE)—causing fever, confusion, personality changes and seizures. If not caught and treated with high-dose antivirals, it’s highly fatal, and even with treatment most children are left with irreversible brain damage.

Why do some children develop HSE while everyone else just shrugs the virus off?

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Moving gene therapy into high gear

A healthy copy of the affected gene is introduced into the patient's stem cells by means of a vector, a genetically altered virus that does not cause ongoing infection. The stem cells, corrected for the defect, are infused back into the patient. (Click to enlarge.)

Gene therapy, still experimental but beginning to enter the clinic, attempts to utilize advanced molecular methods to treat and even reverse genetic diseases. The field started in earnest about 25 years ago and has had many setbacks along the way to its recent earliest successes.

International collaboration has been critical. Children’s Hospital Boston is one of the founding members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium (TAGTC), a new collaboration that seeks to facilitate a more rapid advancement of this technology for treating human diseases. It was initiated shortly after the first trials of gene therapy for X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (X-SCID) (in both Paris and London) reported leukemia as a serious side effect. The TAGTC was formed to address this setback, developing safer gene therapy reagents, sharing the costs of their development, and then implementing new gene therapy trials for rare diseases across multiple international sites.

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