Stories about: inflammatory bowel disease

Could fecal transplants heal Crohn’s and colitis in children? Two trials are set to find out

two trials test fecal transplant in Crohn's and colitis in children

Could an exciting potential treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) be found in the gastrointestinal tract itself? That’s the theory behind a pair of new studies by Stacy A. Kahn, MD, which will investigate the potential role of fecal microbial transplant (FMT) in the treatment of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis in children.

In IBD, the immune system attacks healthy cells in the digestive tract, triggering symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, poor growth and bloody diarrhea. Children with IBD can also experience problems elsewhere in the body, including joint pain, liver disorders and eye inflammation.

Known colloquially as the “poop pill,” or “stool transplant,” FMT harnesses growing knowledge about the gut microbiota, the collection of bacteria and other microbes that populate our GI tract.

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The autism-GI link: Inflammatory bowel disease found more prevalent in ASD patients

brain gut connection autism IBD ASDReports from parents and a growing number of studies over the past 10 to 15 years suggest that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), especially more severe ASD, are prone to gastrointestinal disorders. Researchers have attributed the association to altered GI microbiota, abnormal intestinal physiology, immune alterations and other mechanisms. Some speculate that the connection results from unusual eating patterns in children with ASD.

A 2012 study led by bioinformatician Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School grouped autism patients according to the gene expression patterns in their blood, and one group had altered immunologic and inflammatory pathways. A more recent study went a step further, finding similar gene expression profiles in the intestines of children with ASD and those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Looking at IBD (Crohn’s and colitis) sets the bar a little higher, since IBD is uncommon and also unlikely to be caused by dietary factors (though it can certainly be aggravated by them). In a new study in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Kohane and colleagues crunched three large databases to create what they believe is the largest ASD/IBD study to date.

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Cell therapy for early-onset inflammatory bowel disease?

Macrophage therapy early-onset IBD
Giving patients the right kind of immune cells could curb their IBD, research suggests.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is miserable for anyone, but when it strikes a child under age 5, it’s much more severe, usually causing bloody diarrhea, wrenching abdominal pain and stunted growth. Early-onset IBD is rare, but on the rise: For reasons unknown, its incidence is increasing by about 5 percent per year in some parts of the world.

A recently identified form of early-onset IBD shows up within months of birth, causing severe inflammation in the large intestine and abscesses around the anus. Recently linked to genetic mutations in the cellular receptor for a signaling protein, interleukin-10 (IL-10), it can also lead to lymphoma later in life.

As with all early-onset IBD, IL-10-receptor deficiency has no good treatment. A bone marrow transplant is actually curative, but carries many risks, especially in infants.

“We’ve been trying to understand why IBD in these children is so severe and presents so early,” says Dror Shouval, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and a fellow in the lab of Scott Snapper, MD, PhD. The beginnings of such an understanding—detailed recently in the journal Immunity—could lead to a new treatment approach for this and perhaps other kinds of early-onset IBD.

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Pharmacogenomics: One size doesn’t fit all

Clothing hangers-sizes-Shutterstock croppedIn 2009, The New England Journal of Medicine reported the case of an otherwise healthy 2-year-old boy in Canada who died after surgery. He had received a codeine dose in the recommended range, but an autopsy revealed that morphine (a product of codeine metabolism) had built up to toxic levels in his blood and likely depressed his breathing. Genetic profiling revealed him to be an “ultrarapid codeine metabolizer,” due to a genetic variation in an enzyme known as CYP2D6, part of the cytochrome P-450 family.

While codeine is no longer used at Boston Children’s Hospital, it’s this kind of genetic profiling that Shannon Manzi, PharmD, would someday like to offer to all patients—before a drug is prescribed.

Not all people respond the same way to drugs. The results of randomized clinical trials—considered the gold standard for drug testing—often produce a dose range that worked for the majority of the patients in the study. They don’t take people’s individuality into account, and that individuality can dramatically affect drug efficacy and toxicity.

Adverse reactions are more common than you might think.

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Biomarkers for all

Just about any measurable molecule that changes with health and disease could be a biomarker. (David Guo's Master/Flickr)

Your doctor has a lot of tools to detect, diagnose and monitor disease: x-rays, MRIs, angiography, blood tests, biopsies…the list goes on.

What would be great would be the ability to test for disease in a way where there’s no or low pain (not invasive) and lots of gain (actionable data about the disease process itself, its progression and the success of treatment).

That’s where biomarkers come in.

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