Stories about: Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator

7 digital health predictions for 2017

digital health predictions

What does 2017 have in store for digital healthcare innovations? Vector connected with clinical, digital health and business experts from the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital and asked for their predictions.

Overall? “Expect to see a reshaping of the patient journey, more patient-centric care and more clinically impactful technology in 2017,” says John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer at the hospital. “We’re also looking forward to digital health offerings being met by industry-wide adoption as patient-centric care is provided and reimbursed.”

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Reimagining connected health through home hubs

home health hubs

Through smart home hubs and the growing Internet of Things, people can now control lights, thermostats and other appliances and get information and entertainment with their always-connected digital devices. Consumers have widely adopted home automation products like Nest from Google and ecosystems like Apple’s HomeKit and Amazon’s Alexa.

But home hubs also have the potential to achieve the promise of connected health — access to health care services anywhere and anytime.

Home hubs can deliver enormous value as a means of health care delivery — not just helping casual consumers become familiar with their health and take preventive measures, but also helping manage complex care for patients with chronic illness and supporting timely decision making by clinical teams. Everybody involved with a person’s care can be plugged in, enabling coordination across providers and caregivers in a way that’s increasingly intuitive and meaningful.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Fever, revisited: ResearchKit app will tap crowd-sourced temperature data

Feverprints temperature

What, exactly, is a fever?

It’s a surprisingly simple but important question in medicine. While a body temperature of 98.6°F (37°C) is generally considered “normal,” this number doesn’t account for temperature differences between individuals — and even within individuals at various times of the day. While a common sign of infection, fever can also occur with other medical conditions, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases.

“Many factors come together to set an individual’s ‘normal’ temperature, such as age, size, time of day and maybe even ancestry,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, the director of informatics for Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) and a member of the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program. “We want to help create a better understanding of the normal temperature variations throughout the day, to learn to use fever as a tool to improve medical diagnosis, and to evaluate the effect of fever medications on symptoms and disease course.”

That’s where Feverprints comes in

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment