Stories about: insurance exchanges

CHIP on the block: Should the Children’s Health Insurance Program continue?

chopping block CHIP
Some believe that ACA's insurance exchanges leave gaps in pediatric protection.
Funding for the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) will run out in 2015. Will this leave many kids without health insurance?

About 8 million children currently receive health insurance through CHIP, created in 1997 to bring coverage to children whose families earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to buy private insurance. States administer the program and receive federal matching funds to cover costs. In 2009, Congress reauthorized funding for CHIP through 2015.

What will happen to CHIP beyond 2015 is uncertain, not just because of the funding deadline but also because of changes brought on by the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). Many believe that the ACA’s Medicaid enrollment incentives and expanded tax credits will add so many lower-income kids to the insurance rolls that CHIP will become unnecessary and simply go away. Others, however, say that the plans sold through the ACA’s insurance exchanges could produce gaps in coverage for children, making it crucial to keep CHIP funded.

Read Full Story | 1 Comment | Leave a Comment

How will health insurance exchanges affect doctors and hospitals?

Healthcare.gov button: Apply now for health coverageThe Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s health insurance exchanges opened for business on Oct. 1, and, despite website glitches and non-stop political fighting, citizens across the U.S. can now comparison shop and pick an insurance plan. Time will tell how well the exchanges will work out for consumers, employers and insurers—as well as what effect they will have on pediatricians and hospitals.

According to Wendy Warring, senior vice president, network development and strategic partnerships at Boston Children’s Hospital, the exchanges may force medical professionals to face changes in patient volume, adjustments in reimbursement rates and shifts in how employers provide benefits to insurers. Right now, she says, “people are very confused about public exchanges versus state exchanges versus private exchanges,” and opinions vary on what impact these changes will have on medical professionals.

Read Full Story | 2 Comments | Leave a Comment