Stories about: John Brownstein

Are tweets a good measure of patient experience and health care quality?

Twitter speech bubblesWhen it comes to gauging quality, we often turn to Twitter, Yelp, Angie’s List and other networks for instant feedback on pretty much any company, contractor or store we do business with.

In contrast, hospitals often rely on tools like the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (HCAHPS) survey, which gives voice to patients and their concerns about the care they receive. But a new study published in the journal BMJ Quality & Safety suggests social media have something to add to that.

Notes_title_for_overlay“The main problems with measuring patient experience by survey are the small numbers of people who respond to surveys and the lag time,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program (CHIP). “It can take up to two years before survey data are released to the public. Given that social media data are close to real time, we wanted to see if we could capture this discussion and if the content is useful.”

Hawkins, with Boston Children’s chief innovation officer, John Brownstein, PhD, and their colleagues collected more than 400,000 public tweets directed at the Twitter handles of nearly 2,400 U.S. hospitals between 2012 and 2013. Using machine learning, natural language processing and manual curation, they tagged 34,735 patient experience tweets directed at 1,726 hospital-owned Twitter accounts.

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The MERS death rate in Saudi Arabia is double that in South Korea. Why?

map South Korea Saudi Arabia MERS
(Wikimedia Commons)

The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus outbreak in South Korea is essentially over. (Not so in Saudi Arabia, where the virus first emerged, though—authorities there have reported a major uptick in new MERS cases in recent days.) And while the country gets back on its feet, some interesting data are starting to come out, especially about the outbreak’s case fatality rate (CFR; the percent of patients infected with the virus who died from it).

John Brownstein, PhD, and Maimuna Majumder, MPH, from Boston Children’s HealthMap team just reported in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases that MERS’ CFR in South Korea (22 percent) is fully half that seen in Saudi Arabia (44 percent).

This infographic about Brownstein and Majumder’s MERS paper gives a snapshot of the data the analyzed, and what they think those data mean:

MERS virus South Korea Saudi Arabia infographic

Read Brownstein and Majumder’s analysis and check out Boston Children’s Hospital’s news release about the MERS paper.

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My work, my life: John Brownstein, PhD

Boston Children’s Hospital’s new chief innovation officer, John Brownstein, PhD, is an epidemiologist by training and a founding father of the growing field of digital epidemiology—the use of digital (especially social and mobile) data from a variety of sources to detect and track disease and promote health. As co-founder of HealthMap and director of the Computational Epidemiology Group in the hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program, he infuses his work into many aspects of his life—along with a healthy helping of hot sauce.

Hover over the icons in the photo below to learn about the things in Brownstein’s phone, office and life that keep him going.

Brownstein will be one of four panelists discussing Patient Engagement in a Big Data World at Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015. Learn more about the summit and register to attend.

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So, what’s your digital phenotype?

Ideally, we’re all supposed to see our doctor once a year for a checkup. It’s an opportunity to see how we’re doing from a health perspective, address any concerns or issues that we may have and catch any emerging issues before they become true problems.

But those visits are really only one-time, infrequent snapshots of health. They don’t give a full view of how we’re doing or feeling.

Now, think for a moment about how often you post something to Facebook or Twitter. Do you post anything about whether you’re feeling ill or down, or haven’t slept well? Ever share how far you ran, the route you biked or your number of steps for the day?

Every time you do, you’re creating a data point—another snapshot—about your health. Put those data points together, and what starts to emerge is a rich view of your health, much richer than one based on the records of your occasional medical visit.

As John Brownstein, PhD—director of the Computational Epidemiology Group (CEG) in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Computational Health Informatics Program and the hospital’s new Chief Innovation Officer—explains in this episode of the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Labcast (click the image above to hear it), this view has a name: your digital phenotype.

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Is that fever a problem? Ask Thermia

Thermia fever calculator HealthMap

Your child’s forehead is warm, and you just took her temperature. The next question is, what to do about it? We all know that an average normal temp is 98.6°F, but is 100° a problem? Should 102° be a concern?

This is where Thermia comes in. It’s an online fever calculator developed by the HealthMap team at Boston Children’s Hospital. Essentially, it’s an educational tool aimed at helping concerned parents interpret a child’s temperature and understand which steps they should consider taking.

“I’m a father of two, and I still wonder sometimes what a temperature actually means,” says HealthMap co-founder John Brownstein, PhD. “We realized that there really aren’t any fever calculators out there to help parents answer that question.

“Our idea with Thermia,” he adds, “was to arm families with information so they don’t panic when their child has a temperature.”

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