Stories about: John Meara

3D-printed models assist complex brain surgery for encephalocele

Encephalocele 3D printing

At five months’ gestation, Bentley Yoder was given little chance to live. A routine 20-week “gender reveal” ultrasound showed that a large portion of his brain was growing outside of his skull, a malformation known as an encephalocele. But he was moving and kicking and had a strong heartbeat, so his parents, Sierra and Dustin, carried on with the pregnancy.

Born through a normal vaginal delivery (the doctors felt that a C-section would interfere with Sierra’s grieving process), Bentley surprised everyone by thriving and meeting most of his baby milestones.

But the large protuberance on his head was holding him back. It steadily got larger, filling with cerebrospinal fluid. Bentley couldn’t hold his head up for more than a few seconds.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

3D printing helps doctors plan a toddler’s craniofacial surgery

Plastic surgeon John Meara, MD, and neurosurgeon Mark Proctor, MD, in the Craniofacial Anomalies Program at Boston Children’s Hospital are early adopters of 3D printing technology. They put it to good use in caring for Violet, a buoyant toddler who was diagnosed before birth with a rare, complicated skull and facial defect. Using CT images, and with the help of the hospital’s Simulator Program, they were able to build a series of plastic 3D models of Violet’s skull and rehearse her surgery—months before Violet arrived from Oregon.

“I actually feel like I know her, because I’ve seen that model change and grow over the last several months,” said Meara just before the surgery. “We can see and feel the trajectory of where we will have to make certain cuts, and that’s never been possible before.”

Read more on 3D printing in medicine in the Boston Globe. Follow Violet’s journey in this four-part series, and in The New York Times.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment