Stories about: Jonathan Kagan

When asymptomatic viral infections turn deadly: Lessons from flies

Fruit flies

When Dr. Jonathan Kagan’s student came to him complaining of dying fruit flies, the two were unaware that their research was about to take an unexpected turn. Their goal in establishing Drosophila lines had been to study virus-host interactions. It was quickly subverted when the flies died on exposure to carbon dioxide, used when transferring flies between vials.

This was surprising on two fronts. First, carbon dioxide is routinely used to anesthetize the flies, with no ill effects. Second, the uninfected flies did not die. The virus used to infect the flies, called vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), normally does not cause symptoms, even with the virus making several thousand copies of itself.

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Can we supercharge vaccines? Added compound boosts T-cell production

supercharged vaccines oxPAPCBridging our innate and adaptive immune systems, dendritic cells are sentinels that circulate in the body searching out microbes and activating T-cells to destroy the invaders. They do this by presenting bits of the microbes on their surface—explaining why they’re often called antigen-presenting cells.

Reporting in Science this week, researchers describe a way to push dendritic cells into a “hyperactive” state, supercharging their ability to rally T-cells.

The key player, a fatty chemical called oxPAPC, is naturally found in damaged tissues and atherosclerotic plaques. It selectively targets dendritic cells and could, the researchers believe, enhance people’s immunity to a wide range of infections.

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