Stories about: Judah Folkman

Angiogenesis: The slow growth of a science

angiogenesis

Sometimes a scientific idea takes a long time to make its way forward. Angiogenesis is a case in point. As surgeon-in-chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, Judah Folkman, MD, noted that malignant tumors often had a bloody appearance. In The New England Journal of Medicine in 1971, he hypothesized that tumors cannot grow beyond a certain size without a dedicated blood supply, and that “successful” tumors secrete an unknown substance that encourages blood vessel growth, or angiogenesis.

If angiogenesis could be blocked, he argued, tumors might not grow or spread. Rather than waging a toxic chemical and radiation battle with a tumor, one could starve it into submission by shutting down its blood supply.

The idea was roundly criticized.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

My work, my life, my innovations: Bruce Zetter, PhD

Though Bruce Zetter, PhD, Charles Nowiszewski Professor of Cancer Biology in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Surgery, has had a lifelong passion for science, he once toyed with an alternate career—as an actor. But he stuck with his love for science and pursued a career in academic medicine. Countless patients, students, business partners and mentees have benefitted from that decision.

Read on to sort through a few artifacts from Zetter’s work and life, and if you want to hear more from him, make plans to attend Boston Children’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2015,  Nov. 9 + 10, where Zetter will be the emcee for the third year.

 

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment