Stories about: kidney stones

Personalized medicine for kidney stones

Kidney stones

One in 10 people in their lifetime will have a kidney stone — a small, hard deposit of mineral and acid salts that can obstruct the drainage of urine, cause intense pain and, if not treated properly, lead to long-term kidney issues. Kidney stones are relatively uncommon in children, but the number of cases over the past two decades has risen.

The treatment for kidney stones has remained the same for decades — increased fluid intake, limited sodium intake, diuretics and potassium citrate therapy. Lifestyle factors are typically blamed for kidney stones, yet twin studies suggest a genetic component. In fact, new research supports pursuing a genetic diagnosis for this common condition, especially in kids.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Reducing radiation exposure in kids with kidney stones

A kidney stone seen on CT (James Heilman/Wikimedia Commons)
A kidney stone seen on CT (James Heilman/Wikimedia Commons)
Two national trends have preoccupied Caleb Nelson, MD, MPH, and his colleagues in the Boston Children’s Hospital’s Urology Department over the past few years. One is the rise in overall exposure to medical radiation. The second is specifically the increased use of computed tomography (CT) scans—rather than clinician-preferred ultrasound—in children with kidney stones.

“We see a lot of kids with stones, and there is a clinical need to better manage their condition,” Nelson explains. “Medical radiation is a risk factor for problems down the road, and we know that the amount of radiation people are receiving has gone through the roof in recent years.”

How big is the problem? Nelson cites data collected on radiation exposure on the U.S. population from 1987 to 2006 by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). At the beginning of the study, about 18 percent of all radiation exposure was medical. By 2006, that number had grown to 48 percent (see chart below).

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment