Stories about: Laboratory of Biomaterials and Drug Delivery

Precision drug delivery systems could ‘trigger’ an age of nanomedicine

Nanoscale drug delivery systems could target and destroy diseases in our body with increased precision and reduced side effects.

What if we could deliver biocompatible nanoparticles into the body and then activate them to release drugs exactly where they are needed, without causing side effects elsewhere?

Scientists like Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital, are developing nanoscale drug delivery systems to do just that, using a variety of materials and triggers that are sensitive to a range of specific stimuli.

“Triggerable drug delivery systems could improve the treatment of many diseases by reducing side effects and increasing the effectiveness of therapeutics,” says Kohane, who directs the Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery at Boston Children’s. He is the senior author on a recent article about the topic in Nature Reviews Materials.

One potential use of nanoscale drug delivery systems is of special interest to Kohane and his lab members

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Topical antibiotics for otitis media: A one-squirt cure?

otitis media transtympanic gel
A single-application gel could revolutionize treatment of ear infections, reducing side effects and drug resistance. (Click to play animation.) Credit:Kohane group

Otitis media, or middle-ear infection, affects 95 percent of children and is the number one reason for antibiotic prescriptions in pediatrics. Typically, antibiotic treatment involves 7 to 10 days of oral medication — several times a day — a formidable task for parents of little kids.

“Force-feeding antibiotics to a toddler by mouth is like a full-contact martial art,” says Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, a pediatrician and director of the Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery at Boston Children’s Hospital.

A single-application bioengineered gel could be the answer to parents’ and pediatricians’ prayers. Described in a paper published today in Science Translational Medicine, the gel would provide an entire course of therapy through a single squirt into the ear canal. It was developed by Kohane’s team in collaboration with investigators at Boston Medical Center and Massachusetts Eye and Ear.

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Drug-eluting contact lens offers hope in glaucoma

Daniel Kohane drug-eluting contact lens
Contact lenses ringed with a drug-bearing polymer film provided gradual, sustained drug release in this preclinical study, potentially offering an alternative to eye drops.

Daily medicated eye drops are the first line of treatment for glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness. The drops relieve pressure in the eye, a significant risk factor for glaucoma. But they’re not ideal: their delivery is imprecise, they can cause stinging and burning and patients often struggle to administer them. Adherence is poor: in one study based on insurance claims data, nearly half of patients who had filled a glaucoma prescription stopped topical glaucoma therapy within six months.

Engineered contact lenses dispensing glaucoma medication gradually could vastly improve adherence, helping hang onto their eyesight longer. In a pre-clinical study of glaucoma published online this week in the journal Ophthalmology, slow-release lenses lowered eye pressure at least as well as daily eye drops containing the drug latanoprost — and, in a higher-dose form, possibly more so.

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Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, at TEDMED: “Smart vehicles for safer medications”

“The drugs that I take don’t just go to the places in my body they’re supposed to go to do the things they do. They actually go everywhere. And what they do in those other places can be whatever.”

With those words, Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD—director of the Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery at Boston Children’s Hospital—launched into a TEDMED talk about technologies that get drugs to where they need to go with much greater precision, like:

“Progress in this field is limited only by the imagination of the investigators and, to some degree, by reality,” says Kohane, who also sees patients in Boston Children’s Department of Critical Care Medicine. “You can achieve really big things by thinking really small.”

Click the image above to watch his whole talk.

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