Stories about: language disorders

Augmentative and alternative communication: A new generation of tools for autism

With initial help from her mother, Kailee West, 6, quickly masters the basics of Puddingstone Place, an interactive virtual environment that helps children with autism develop language skills.
With initial help from her mother, Kailee West, 6, quickly masters the basics of Puddingstone Place, an interactive virtual environment that helps children with autism develop language skills.

In the 1990s, Facilitated Communication (FC), in which assistants “facilitate” the typing of thoughts by minimally verbal children by supporting their hands, began raising hopes in the autism community. The unproven procedure caught fire, and Syracuse University established a nationally recognized Facilitated Communication Institute.

Upon closer examination, though, doubts emerged. The messages were surprisingly sophisticated and written by children who often were not even looking at the keyboard. Critics charged that the words were actually those of the facilitator rather than the patient. Studies and organizations began discrediting FC.

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Steroids for regressive autism?

Preliminary findings suggest steroid treatment could improve language and behavior in children with ASD.
Preliminary findings suggest that steroid treatment could improve language and behavior in children with regressive ASD.

In as many as a third of cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), children’s language and social skills develop normally at first. Then, between 1 and 2 ½ years of age, they begin to regress, losing words and retreating from interactions with parents—often abruptly. There has been some anecdotal evidence that steroid treatment can help these children, and a small retrospective study agrees—finding improved language and behavior and reversal of a characteristic abnormality in the language processing area of their brains.

Researchers led by Frank H. Duffy, MD, of the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, looked back at 20 children 3 to 5 years old with documented regressive ASD who had received steroid therapy (prednisolone) under a neurologist’s supervision, generally starting several months after their regression was noted. For comparison, the team also reviewed data from 24 similar autistic children who did not receive steroids.

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