Stories about: Louis Kunkel

Two resilient dogs point to new targets for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Duchenne muscular dystrophy protective genes
Suflair, at right, is alive and well at 11 years despite having the DMD mutation (courtesy Natássia Vieira)

Two golden retrievers that had the genetic mutation for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet remained healthy, have offered up yet another lead for treating this muscle-wasting disorder.

For several years, Natássia Vieira, PhD, of the University of São Paolo, also a fellow in the Boston Children’s Hospital lab of Louis Kunkel, PhD, has been studying a Brazilian colony of golden retrievers. All have the classic DMD mutation and, as expected, most of these dogs are very weak and typically die by 2 years of age. That’s analogous to children with DMD, who typically lose the ability to walk by adolescence and die from cardiorespiratory failure by young adulthood.

But two dogs appeared unaffected. Both ran around normally. The elder dog, Ringo, lived a full lifespan, and his son Suflair is still alive and well at age 11.

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Muscular dystrophy study suggests new therapeutic approaches to autism

muscular dystrophy autism social interaction
In addition to weakening muscle cells, loss of dystrophin also impairs Purkinje cells in the cerebellum.

Robin Kleiman, PhD, is Director of Preclinical Research at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Translational Neuroscience Center.

One of the hardest parts of developing new treatments for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is that almost every patient has a different combination of environmental and genetic risk factors. This suggests that every patient could take a unique path to their diagnosis. It is hard to come up with a single treatment that will help patients with fundamentally different root causes of ASD.

One way to approach this problem is to look for ways to cluster sub-types of autism for clinical trials, based on genetic risk factors or the types of neural circuits that are affected. If circuit dysfunction could be monitored and diagnosed easily in patients, it might be possible to develop treatments to reverse the dysfunction that cut across genetic and environmental causes of ASD. That is the hope of research on well-defined “syndromic” causes of autism such as tuberous sclerosis complex, Fragile X syndrome and Rett syndrome.

Accelerating research collaborations to design clinical trials for children with brain disorders, including ASD, is a major mission of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Translational Neuroscience Center (TNC). A recent study in Translational Psychiatry, led by Mathew Alexander, PhD, in the Boston Children’s lab of Lou Kunkel, PhD, in collaboration with the TNC and Pfizer, is a prime example. It suggests that patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may constitute another subset of ASD patients — one that could benefit from phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors, a family of drugs including Viagra.

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An unusual dog, a new approach to muscular dystrophy: Stimulating a protective gene

muscular dystrophy
Vieira with Ringo

Ringo was a golden retriever that defied the odds. Despite having the gene mutation for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), he remained healthy. And he’s provided a new lead for boosting muscle strength in DMD, one of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy. Unlike other dogs with the dystrophin mutation, who are weak and typically die by 2 years of age, Ringo was able to walk and run normally and lived to the age of 11, within the normal range for golden retrievers.

What made Ringo so resilient?

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