Stories about: lung disease

3D organoids and RNA sequencing reveal the crosstalk driving lung cell formation

lung disease
A healthy lung must maintain two key cell populations: airway cells (left), and alveolar epithelial cells (right). (Joo-Hyeon Lee)

To stay healthy, our lungs have to maintain two key populations of cells: the alveolar epithelial cells, which make up the little sacs where gas exchange takes place, and bronchiolar epithelial cells (also known as airway cells) that are lined with smooth muscle.

“We asked, how does a stem cell know whether it wants to make an airway or an alveolar cell?” says Carla Kim, PhD, of the Stem Cell Research Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Figuring this out could help in developing new treatments for such lung disorders as asthma and emphysema, manipulating the natural system for treatment purposes.

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Reversing lung disease in mice by coaxing production of healthy cells

Using a novel 3-D culture method, scientists were able to prod lung (bronchioalveolar) stem cells to produce colonies containing the cell type of choice: airway (bronchiolar) epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells or both. (Images: Joo-Hyeon Lee)
Using a novel 3-D culture method, scientists were able to prod lung (bronchioalveolar) stem cells to produce colonies with the cell type of choice: airway (bronchiolar) epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells or both. (Images: Joo-Hyeon Lee)

Someday it may be possible to treat lung diseases like emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis or asthma by prodding the lungs to produce healthy versions of the cells that are damaged.

That’s the hope of researchers Carla Kim, PhD, and Joo-Hyeon Lee, PhD, of the Stem Cell Research Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. In the Jan. 30 issue of Cell, they describe a pathway in the lungs, activated by injury, that directs stem cells to transform into specific kinds of cells—and that can be manipulated to enhance different kinds of repair, at least in a mouse model.

By boosting the pathway, Kim, Lee and colleagues successfully increased production of alveolar epithelial cells, which line the lung’s alveoli—the tiny sacs where gas exchange takes place, and that are irreversibly damaged in diseases like pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

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