Stories about: macrophages

How do cells release IL-1? The answer packs a punch, and could enable better vaccines

In hyperactivated immune cells, gasdermin D punches holes in the cell membrane that let IL-1 out — without killing the cell.

Interleukin-1 (IL-1), first described in 1984, is the original, highly potent member of the large family of cellular signaling molecules called cytokines that regulate immune responses and inflammation. It’s a key part of our immune response to infections, and also plays a role in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Several widely used anti-inflammatory drugs, such as anakinra, block IL-1 to treat rheumatoid arthritis, systemic inflammatory diseases, gout and atherosclerosis. IL-1 is also a target of interest in Alzheimer’s disease.

Yet until now, no one knew how IL-1 gets released by our immune cells.

“Most proteins have a secretion signal that causes them to leave the cell,” says Jonathan Kagan, PhD, an immunology researcher in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Gastroenterology. “IL-1 doesn’t have that signal. Many people have championed the idea that IL-1 is passively released from dead cells: you just die and dump everything outside.”

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