Stories about: macular telangiectasia

Age-related macular disease: Is energy starvation a cause?

age-related macular degneration
Hunger distress signal: Energy-starved photoreceptor cones in the retina (colored blue) call for nourishment by releasing a cloud of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; in yellow). The VEGF draws poor-quality, leakage-prone blood vessels (in red), branching from a nearby blood supply. (Image: Jean-Sebastien Joyal)

New insights could potentially change the treatment of two diseases causing blindness: “Wet” age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of severe vision loss in Americans over 60, and a less common condition called macular telangiectasia (MacTel) that occurs in middle age.

Both diseases are caused by abnormal growth of misshapen, leaky blood vessels in the eye that damages the macula, the central part of the retina needed to for straight-ahead vision.

The trigger for this pathologic process had been widely thought to be oxygen deprivation. However, findings published today by Nature Medicine suggest another cause: dysfunctional energy metabolism in the eye that starves the retina’s photoreceptors of fuel.

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