Stories about: Martha Murray

Inside bridge-enhanced ACL repair

An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear can be a devastating sports injury. Every year, 400,000 people, many of them teen and young adult athletes, sustain ACL injuries or tears. Martha Murray, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital, worked with a team of colleagues to create a new procedure known as bridge-enhanced ACL repair (BEAR) that encourages natural healing. Watch this animation to see how it works:

Why do surgeons need a better way to repair ACL injuries?

The current standard of care, surgical ACL reconstruction, is a good solution. But it is linked with a 20 percent risk of re-tearing the ACL, and many young patients face an increased risk of arthritis. Instead of removing the torn ACL and replacing it with a tendon graft, the BEAR technique uses a special protein-enriched sponge to encourage the torn ends to reconnect and heal. The researchers have completed a 20-patient safety trial and are enrolling additional patients in a 200-patient clinical study.

Learn more about Murray’s research.

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A bridge to a 21st century ACL repair

Tears of the knee’s anterior cruciate ligament — or ACL — are on the rise in middle school and high school athletes. The current treatment involves grafting in a piece of tendon from elsewhere in the body. It works very well, but requires six months to two years of post-op rehabilitation to regain strength in the knee and the place where the tendon was taken from (often the hamstring). Plus, up to 80 percent of patients develop arthritis within 15 years of the procedure.

Orthopedic surgeon Martha Murray, MD, wondered, “What if we could somehow stimulate the original ACL to heal back together?”

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