Stories about: medical missionaries

Along with “fixing” cleft lip comes correcting misperceptions about its causes

OP-Smile-IThroughout the world, a child is born with a cleft lip or palate nearly every three minutes. In resource-poor areas, many of these children die before their first birthday, and those who survive have difficulty eating, speaking and being accepted by their peers.

Lauren Mednick, PhD, a pediatric psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, knows this all too well. As a child life specialist with Operation Smile, she was part of a medical missionary team that traveled the world providing safe, effective reconstructive surgery and treatment to children with clefts and other facial deformities.

Working closely with these children and their families, Mednick was amazed at how many of them blamed the child’s condition on themselves, the supernatural or a combination of the two. She listened as a mother in Morocco “confessed” that her baby had been born with a cleft lip, because she looked at an animal with a cloven hoof during her pregnancy. She sat with a Haitian woman who attributed her child’s cleft lip to an afternoon when she spent too long looking at a child in her village with a facial deformity.

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Hydrocephalus: Tackling a global health problem

Benjamin Warf, MD, director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomalies Neurosurgery at Children’s Hospital Boston, developed a new treatment for infant hydrocephalus, or “water on the brain,” while a medical missionary in Africa, where hydrocephalus is common and usually untreated. His innovation, which has saved the lives of thousands of children, is minimally invasive, relatively inexpensive and has been taught to other surgeons in developing countries. The post below is adapted from Warf’s testimony last week before the House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health and Human Rights (viewable on C-SPAN; jump to 17:54). John Mugamba, MD, whom Warf trained and who is currently medical director at CURE Children’s Hospital of Uganda, gave testimony in video form.

In 2000, my family and I moved to Uganda as medical missionaries to help start a specialty hospital for pediatric neurosurgery, the CURE Children’s Hospital of Uganda. At the time, there were no pediatric neurosurgical hospitals and few trained neurosurgeons in all of Africa.

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