Stories about: medical research funding

Why we’re glad the Cures Act passed: Its provisions benefit children

Cures Act children
Via @POTUS

Amy Judge DeLong is manager of Federal Government Relations at Boston Children’s Hospital.

In the midst of a seismic shift in Presidential administrations and anticipation of the incoming Congress, a landmark medical research bill with several provisions important to children cleared the lame duck session of Congress. The 21st Century Cures Act (Cures) is the end result of nearly three years of bipartisan Congressional activity. Last week, it was signed into law.

Cures includes scores of provisions aimed at strengthening National Institutes of Health funding for medical research and accelerating review efforts at the Food and Drug Administration. The law cleared Congress with overwhelming majorities, an example of bipartisanship that may be challenged in the months ahead.

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The Accelerating Medicines Partnership: Transforming biomedical consortia and R&D

Group handshake representing a consortiumDavid Altman is manager of marketing and communications in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Technology and Innovation Development Office.

Successful therapeutic development requires multiple stakeholders along the path from discovery to translation to clinical trials to FDA approval to market availability. At various points along this path, academia, industry, government, hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists may work together. Would bringing these stakeholders together from start to finish lead to greater success?

A growing number of private-public consortia are launching in defined “pre-competitive” spaces where potential rivals collaborate to generate tools and data to accelerate biomedical research. In 1995, consortia were rare in health care: Only one was created. In 2012, 51 new consortia were launched, according to the organization Faster Cures.

Why? you may ask. Banding together in consortia can reduce costs, minimize failures and shorten the timeline to approval for new drugs.

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Children as ‘orphans’ of innovation: Finding good homes

Cows provided tuberculosis-free milk to Boston Children's Hospital in 1919.
An early innovation: Specially bred cows graze in front of Boston Children’s Hospital in 1919, providing safe, tuberculosis-free milk for patients.
Clinicians wanting to develop new devices and treatments for children face formidable barriers: regulators’ need to protect the most vulnerable coupled with a lack of commercial interest. But determined innovators do have options, including creative funding sources, says Thomas Krummel, MD, director of surgical innovation at Stanford Medical School.

“Technology developed specifically for children has been a low priority,” Krummel began at a two-part talk at Boston Children’s Hospital this summer (read our coverage of the other part). “The FDA barriers are incredibly high, and ultimately, investors just demand returns that pediatric markets won’t necessarily deliver.”

As Krummel detailed, the FDA barriers are there for a reason: a past history of ethical abuses in human subjects research. In 1966, physician Henry Beecher, MD, exposed many examples in The New England Journal of Medicine, such as withholding effective treatment for the sake of research, proceeding with a treatment despite recognized hazards, or failing to disclose risk to patients. Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) arose in the mid-1970s to protect research subjects—protections that are especially strict when that research is done in children.

But there’s also a deep-seated reluctance to break with the status quo.

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