Stories about: melanoma

Fishing for new leads in rare mucosal melanoma

Leonard Zon and Julien Ablain in the zebrafish facility
Leonard Zon and Julien Ablain are finding that zebrafish can tell us a lot about cancer. (PHOTO: SHANE HURLEY/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

Zebrafish are an emerging power tool in cancer research. They can be engineered to light up when certain genes turn on — capturing the moment when a cancer is initiated. Because they breed so quickly, they lend themselves to rapid, large-scale chemical screening studies, so can help identify tumor promoters and suppressors. Now, as a new study in Science demonstrates, zebrafish can also help scientists dissect the intricate molecular pathways that underlie many cancers, and could help guide treatment strategies — in this case, for mucosal melanoma.

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The cell that caused melanoma: Cancer’s surprise origins, caught in action

It’s long been a mystery why some of our cells can have mutations associated with cancer, yet are not truly cancerous. Now researchers have, for the first time, watched a cancer spread from a single cell in a live animal, and found a critical step that turns a merely cancer-prone cell into a malignant one.

Their work, published today in Science, offers up a new set of therapeutic targets and could even help revive a theory first floated in the 1950s known as “field cancerization.”

“We found that the beginning of cancer occurs after activation of an oncogene or loss of a tumor suppressor, and involves a change that takes a single cell back to a stem cell state,” says Charles Kaufman, MD, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Zon Laboratory at Boston Children’s Hospital and the paper’s first author.

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Why does a new class of drugs work so well against melanoma?

nivolumab, pembrolizumab and melanoma
Anti-PD-1 antibodies may deliver a one-two punch in melanoma

Recent clinical trials for patients with advanced melanoma have found that a new class of drugs—anti-PD-1 antibodies—can elicit an unprecedented response rate. In the last year, the FDA gave accelerated approval to two anti-PD-1 antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, for patients with advanced melanoma (including Jimmy Carter) who are no longer responding to other drugs. And there’s growing evidence that this class of drugs may be effective in treating other forms of cancer.

Anti-PD-1 antibodies target a receptor on activated T cells, known as the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor. Tumor cells stimulate this inhibitory receptor to dodge immune attack, whereas anti-PD-1 antibodies block the same pathway, “waking up” the immune cells so they can attack the cancer. The drugs have been hailed as one of the first cancer immunotherapy success stories.

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The cell from hell: Can we outsmart cancer stem cells?

Cancer stem cells’ clever defenses may be the seeds of their undoing. (Image: leftover bacon/OpenClipArt)

Some scientists still debate the existence of cancer stem cells – rare cells that can singlehandedly perpetuate a tumor, and possibly make it more aggressive.  But others have moved on, isolating candidate cancer stem cells and documenting their distinctive characteristics and markers.

And some are starting to figure out how these cells operate and leverage that knowledge to come up with new approaches to cancer therapy.

Children’s scientist Markus Frank has been building quite a dossier on cancer stem cells, starting with melanoma stem cells. “Many of the features that make a cancer bad seem to be localized in this subpopulation of cells,” he says.

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