Stories about: mental retardation

When reading genes, read the instructions first: Epigenetics and developmental disorders

The genome holds the instructions for making proteins, while the epigenome holds the instructions for reading the genes. Yang Shi wants to understand how those epigenetic instructions are read, especially in cases of intellectual disabilities. (JackBet/Flickr)

While the genome’s As, Ts, Cs, and Gs hold the instructions for making proteins, how does a cell know when to read a gene? And could it relate to developmental disorders?

These gene-reading instructions are encoded in our epigenome, a set of factors that give our cells exquisite control over when and where to turn individual genes on and off. This control involves a delicate and complex dance between DNA and proteins called histones – DNA wraps itself around histones to create a complex called chromatin – as well as the many different types of epigenetic tags.

Yang Shi, of the Division of Newborn Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston, wants to understand what happens when the genome doesn’t read the epigenome’s instructions correctly, which in the developing brain can cause intellectual disabilities.

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Neurogenetic disorders: Dreaming the impossible dream

People with autism and most other disorders of brain development have never had medications to treat their core behavioral and cognitive symptoms. The best they can get are drugs targeting secondary problems, like irritability or aggression. But now, a new wave of clinical trials, such as the one we posted about yesterday for Rett syndrome, aims to change this.

In the last decade, scientists have discovered many of the molecular pathways in genetic disorders that can impair cognition and place a child on the autism spectrum—such as tuberous sclerosis complex, Rett syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and Angelman syndrome. These discoveries are suggesting targets for drug treatment, and is changing how these conditions—and perhaps neurodevelopmental disorders generally—are viewed.

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