Stories about: Michael Costigan

Can rare pain syndromes point the way to new analgesics?

analgesic drug discovery could reduce prescription opioid use
Boston Children’s Hospital and Amgen will collaborate to discover and accelerate non-addicting pain drugs.

As the opioid epidemic deepens and drug overdoses increase, effective non-addicting painkillers are desperately needed. Efforts to discover new pain pathways to target with new drugs have thus far had little success. Other promising research is investigating triggerable local delivery systems for non-opioid nerve blockers, but it’s still in the early stages.

A new collaboration between Boston Children’s Hospital and the biopharmaceutical company Amgen is aimed at accelerating new pain treatments. Announced yesterday, it will revolve around patients with rare, perplexing pain syndromes. The scientists hope that the genetic variants they find in these patients will shed new light on pain biology and lead to new ways of controlling pain. 

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Fast-regenerating mice offer clues for stroke, spinal cord and optic nerve injury

axon regeneration CNS
The CAST mouse from Thailand–genetically distinct from most lab mice–may have the right ingredients for nerve regeneration. (Courtesy Jackson Laboratory)

Second in a two-part series on nerve regeneration. Read part 1.

The search for therapies to spur regeneration after spinal cord injury, stroke and other central nervous system injuries hasn’t been all that successful to date. Getting nerve fibers (axons) to regenerate in mammals, typically lab mice, has often involved manipulating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes to encourage growth, a move that could greatly increase a person’s risk of cancer.

A study published online last week by Neuron, led by the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, took a completely different tactic.

Seeing little success at first, the researchers wondered whether they were working with the wrong mice.

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