Stories about: Michael Costigan

Natural killer cells: A new angle on neuropathic pain

natural killer cells, peripheral nerve damage and neuropathic pain
Like an immune cleanup crew, natural killer cells (green) infiltrate a damaged axon. (IMAGE: ALEXANDER DAVIES / SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD)

Scientists have known since the 1800s what happens to a totally crushed peripheral nerve in animals: the damaged axons are broken down in a process called Wallerian degeneration, allowing healthy ones to regrow. But humans rarely suffer complete axonal damage. Instead, axons tend to be partially damaged, causing neuropathic pain — a difficult-to-treat, chronic pain associated with nerve trauma, chemotherapy and diabetes.

The lab of Michael Costigan, PhD, in Boston Children’s Hospital’s F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center is studying how the body’s immune system breaks down these damaged nerves. Their latest research, published today in Cell, may change our understanding of neuropathic pain and how to treat it.

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Deconstructing neuropathic pain: Could it give clues to better drugs?

neuropathic pain

Neuropathic pain is chronic pain originating through some malfunction of the nervous system, often triggered by an injury. It causes hypersensitivity to innocuous stimuli and is often extremely debilitating. It doesn’t respond to existing painkillers — even opioids can’t reach it well.

New research in a mouse model, described last week in Cell Reports, deconstructed neuropathic pain and could offer new leads for treating it. The carefully done study showed that two major neuropathic pain symptoms in patients — extreme touch sensitivity and extreme cold sensitivity — operate through separate pathways.

“We think this separation will allow targeted drug-based therapies in the future,” says Michael Costigan, PhD, of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, who was the study’s senior investigator. “If our results stand experimental scrutiny by others, this will be profoundly important in our overall understanding of neuropathic pain.”

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Can rare pain syndromes point the way to new analgesics?

analgesic drug discovery could reduce prescription opioid use
Boston Children’s Hospital and Amgen will collaborate to discover and accelerate non-addicting pain drugs.

As the opioid epidemic deepens and drug overdoses increase, effective non-addicting painkillers are desperately needed. Efforts to discover new pain pathways to target with new drugs have thus far had little success. Other promising research is investigating triggerable local delivery systems for non-opioid nerve blockers, but it’s still in the early stages.

A new collaboration between Boston Children’s Hospital and the biopharmaceutical company Amgen is aimed at accelerating new pain treatments. Announced yesterday, it will revolve around patients with rare, perplexing pain syndromes. The scientists hope that the genetic variants they find in these patients will shed new light on pain biology and lead to new ways of controlling pain. 

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Fast-regenerating mice offer clues for stroke, spinal cord and optic nerve injury

axon regeneration CNS
The CAST mouse from Thailand–genetically distinct from most lab mice–may have the right ingredients for nerve regeneration. (Courtesy Jackson Laboratory)

Second in a two-part series on nerve regeneration. Read part 1.

The search for therapies to spur regeneration after spinal cord injury, stroke and other central nervous system injuries hasn’t been all that successful to date. Getting nerve fibers (axons) to regenerate in mammals, typically lab mice, has often involved manipulating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes to encourage growth, a move that could greatly increase a person’s risk of cancer.

A study published online last week by Neuron, led by the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, took a completely different tactic.

Seeing little success at first, the researchers wondered whether they were working with the wrong mice.

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