Stories about: microbes

Botulinum-type toxins jump to a new kind of bacteria. Should we sound an alarm?

(Illustration: Elena Hartley)

Enterococci are hardy microbes that thrive in the gastrointestinal tracts of nearly all land animals, including our own, and generally cause no harm. But their ruggedness has lately made them leading causes of multi-drug-resistant infections, especially in settings like hospitals where antibiotic use disrupts the natural balance of intestinal microbes.

So the discovery of a new toxin in a strain of Enterococcus is raising scientific eyebrows. Isolated from cow feces sampled at a South Carolina farm, the bug was unexpectedly found to carry a toxin resembling the toxin that causes botulism. The finding was reported this week in the journal Cell Host and Microbe.

“This is the first time a botulinum neurotoxin has been found outside of Clostridium botulinum — and not just the toxin, but an entire unit containing the toxin and associated proteins that prevent the toxin from being degraded in the GI tract,” says Min Dong, PhD, a scientist in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Urology and Harvard Medical School and one of the world’s experts on botulinum toxins.

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Food for thought: How your microbiome celebrates Thanksgiving

Image of microbiome superimposed over a Thanksgiving turkeySeth Rakoff-Nahoum, MD, PhD, a Boston Children’s Hospital physician-scientist who does infectious disease research and is taking an evolutionary approach to understanding the human microbiome and its effect on health, offers us some insight into what’s happening to the bugs in our gut as a result of the Thanksgiving meal. 

Q: Does the traditional American Thanksgiving meal affect the human microbiome?

A: Anything you put in your body has the potential to affect your microbiome, and Thanksgiving dinner is no different.

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